There is further reporting which suggests the initial report of 4 crew perishing in the sinking of MV ALBEDO was correct. The remaining 11 crew members have apparently been taken ashore to an unknown location.

A yellow hulled FV DEEQA was reported missing and assumed stolen from Boosaaso Harbour. There are no indications that the FV is being used for piracy activity.

It is requested that ships’ masters conform with the standard operating procedures for reporting possible acts of piracy as recommended in BMP4. A reminder that without providing this information in a timely manner, UKMTO, MSC HOA and NSC cannot pass data onto warships in the region. Delays in reporting incidents increase the search area and therefore decrease the likelihood of investigating and/or capturing possible pirates. It is recognized that the Gulf of Aden and the Bab el Mandeb is a very difficult environment in which to distinguish benign activity from that of potential pirates however a clear and timely flow of information is critical.

No changes to the current weather pattern. The Southwest monsoon conditions continue to dominate the region and will remain in position until the fall when there will be a breakdown in the dominant weather system and the transition to the North east monsoon season. Until sometime around September the overall forecast for small boat / skiff operations is unfavourable along the East Coast of Somalia extending from the tip of the Horn of Africa down through the Somali Basin.

Old Report

The most significant piracy event this week was the sinking of MV ALBEDO in her anchorage position off the East Coast of Somalia near Haradheere. There are reports of 4 crew members and 7 pirates perishing in the sinking however these numbers have not been confirmed. No further information with regards to the whereabouts of the remaining crew is available at this time.

There have been no reports of pirate activity, this could be partially due to the particularly strong monsoon effects being experienced in the Somali Basin and up into the Eastern approaches of the Gulf of Aden where winds and sea states have created very unfavourable conditions for small boats and skiffs. However, despite the unfavourable sea states in the Indian Ocean and Somali Basin pirate groups retain the capability and intent to conduct attacks and have the potential to attack with little or no warning. To counter an attack, the crew must take proactive counter-piracy preparations and remain aware of their environment as they transit the region. Moreover, if a vessel comes under attack, reporting the event as quickly as possible to the UKMTO and MSC HOA will allow for the manoeuvring of naval assets in the region.

The South west monsoon conditions will continue to dominate the region until sometime in the fall when the weather system will breakdown and transition to the North east monsoon season. Until then the overall forecast for small boat / skiff operations is unfavourable along the East Coast of Somalia extending from the tip of the Horn of Africa down through the Somali Basin.

For further information on basic regional and seasonal fishing information please go to the following page: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/Fishing_in_the_HRA.aspx

Old Report

MV ROYAL GRACE was released on 8 March 2013 after being held for over a year by Somali pirates. The vessel is currently underway and receiving assistance from a military vessel in the area. Subsequently, MT SMYRNI was also released on 10 March after having been held since 10 May 2012.
All masters are advised to maintain heightened vigilance when at anchor and when loitering/queuing as there may be a higher likelihood of these vessels being targeted by pirates. The uniform risk to merchant vessels throughout the HRA is a reminder of the need to be alert for such activity at all times. In order to mitigate any vulnerability, it is strongly recommended that all vessels maintain a high state of readiness, implementing BMPs and citadel preparedness, while in the HRA. Although sea states in some regions have become marginal with the onset of the Northeast Monsoon, small boats are still able to operate.
Recently, there have been a number of incidents reported to Counter Piracy organisations in the HRA involving small craft approaches to merchant vessels. Although these incidents may appear to be piracy related, the majority actually are not and have been assessed as non-piracy related activity common to the pattern of life in the area. This can include fishing, small vessel trade, smuggling and other local traffic. Please note that, if the NATO Shipping Centre assesses an approach or incident to be piracy-related, we will issue relevant warnings and alerts, keeping the merchant shipping community fully informed at all times

During the reporting period of 16-22 January 2013 there were no piracy related incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA).

Merchant vessels are reminded to remain vigilant while transiting this area and ensure that Self Protection Measures are in place as Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) may be operating in the area. Although sea states in some parts of the HRA have become more marginal with the onset of the Northeast Monsoon season, small boats are still be able to operate.

During the past few months there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the HRA. Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 09 – 16 January 2013 there were no piracy related incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA).

The last of the hostages from the MV Orna have been released. The ship was pirated in Dec 2010 and freed in Oct 2012. However, a number of crew members had been kept in captivity until recently.

Also released from pirate control this past week was the MV Iceberg 1, this brings the number of vessels in captivity down to 4.

Merchant vessels are reminded to remain vigilant while transiting this area and ensure that Self Protection Measures are in place as PAGs may be operating in the area. Although sea states in some parts of the HRA have become more marginal with the onset of the Northeast monsoon, small boats are still be able to operate.

During the past few months there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the HRA. Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Old Report

Alert 001/13: At 1130Z (UTC) on 05 Jan 2013 a merchant vessel reported an attack by pirates/1 skiff at position 0300N 05152E. The skiff had a white hull, 6 POB, fired small arms and RPG. This vessel managed to evade hijack. On 06 Jan 2013, the Pirate Activity Group (PAG) responsible for this attack was disrupted by coordinated NATO and EU assets in the area.

At 0750Z on 08 Jan 13 there was an incident involving a merchant vessel transiting the Bab al Mandeb. Vessel is safe. This event has since been classified as suspicious activity.

In the light of these incidents, areas of concern have been posted to our PAG map in the Gulfs of Oman and Aden and off the Somali coast. The PAG map is available at http://www.shipping.nato.int/ and is updated regularly.

Merchant vessels are advised to remain vigilant throughout the HRA and ensure that Self Protection Measures are in place as PAGs may be operating in the area. Although sea states in some parts of the HRA have become more marginal with the onset of the Northeast monsoon, small boats are still be able to operate.

During the past few months there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the HRA. Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Old Report

At 0535Z 27 Dec 2012, a merchant vessel near the Strait of Hormuz (2617N; 05643E) reported an approach by two skiffs. First skiff approached to within 500 metres; possible weapons sighted. Vessel’s armed security team fired flares and skiff moved away. Second skiff then approached to within 200m. Second skiff reportedly broke away after vessel’s armed security team fired warning shots. Vessel is safe.

At 1030Z 27 Dec 2012, a merchant vessel reported an approach by two skiffs off the Omani coast. Skiffs accelerated towards ship and followed, but broke off after a flare was fired. The vessel is safe.

Also on 27 Dec 2012, BNS Louise Marie disrupted a suspect skiff with three men aboard 400 nm off the Somali coast. Following confiscation of equipment, the men were subsequently landed on the Somali coast.

At 1721Z 30 Dec 2012, a merchant vessel reported suspicious activity by two skiffs in the Gulf of Aden. The skiffs broke off after a flare was fired. The vessel is safe.

On 01 Jan 2013, a merchant vessel reported an incident involving four skiffs at 0218N 04602E that occurred at 1130Z. The vessel is safe and the incident is being investigated further.

In the light of these incidents, areas of concern have been posted to our Piracy Attack Group (PAG) map in the Gulfs of Oman and Aden and off the Somali coast. The PAG map is available at http://www.shipping.nato.int and is updated regularly.

Merchant vessels are advised to remain vigilant throughout the HRA and ensure that Self Protection Measures are in place as Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) may be operating in the area. Although sea states in some parts of the HRA have become more marginal with the onset of the Northeast monsoon, small boats are still be able to operate.

Any areas of concern will be posted to our PAG map which is available on During the past few months there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the HRA. Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Counter Piracy Guidance

Continued threat The threat of piracy against merchant shipping continues throughout the entire HRA . Despite the deterioration in conditions associated with the Northeast monsoon, sea states remain conducive to piracy operations. Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. However, are able to act far off the coast of Somalia and are likely in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection Measures.
Need for continued vigilance and use of BMP. Merchant vessels are advised to remain vigilant throughout the HRA and ensure that Self Protection Measures are implemented as recommended in BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the critical difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. NSC would like to remind masters that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining best possible vessel speed when transiting the HRA to deter pirate boardings.

Registration and reporting Per Section 5 of BMP4, early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and initial and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended to ensure military authorities are aware of a vessel’s passage and vulnerabilities.

Reporting of incidents It has been observed that some Masters are choosing to phone their Company Security Officer (CSO) first in the event of a piracy incident. However, one of the fundamental requirements of BMP4 is that UKMTO is the primary point of contact for merchant vessels during piracy incidents in the HRA. This aims to avoid unnecessary delay and prevent inaccurate or incomplete information from reaching military commanders. CSOs should ensure their ships’ security plans reinforce the BMP4 recommendation that UKMTO be immediately telephoned at +971 50 55 23215 in the event of any piracy activity. UKMTO will then make it a priority to contact the CSO with any information received whilst ensuring the relevant information reaches the military commanders with the minimum of delay. Masters should provide as much accurate information as possible. This will ensure the incident can be fully assessed and information is quickly provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance. If Masters are safely able to take pictures and/or video of the suspicious activity, please provide these via email to UKMTO at ukmto@eim.ae, to the NSC (NATO Shipping Centre) at info@shipping.nato.int and to the Maritime Security Centre Horn of Africa (MSCHOA) at postmaster@mschoa.org. This information will be used by Counter Piracy forces to combat piracy activity.

Pirate tactics Recently, PAGs have made “soft-approaches” on merchant ships transiting the HRA. A skiff will often approach a vessel in order to probe the reactivity of an embarked security team (if present). If no response, the pirates may proceed with an attack, sometimes accompanied by a second skiff. This practice is likely more economical as they would avoid needless expenditure of resources, such as ammunition, and personal risk without a significant probability of success.

Other activity There have been a number of incidents reported to Counter Piracy organisations in the HRA involving small craft approaches to merchant vessels. Although these incidents may appear to be piracy related, the majority actually are not and have been assessed as non-piracy related activity common to the pattern of life in the area. This can include fishing, small vessel trade, smuggling and other local traffic. Please note that, if we assess an approach or incident to be piracy, we will issue relevant warnings and alerts, keeping the merchant shipping community fully informed at all times.

Sailing vessels Sailing yachts should avoid transiting the HRA. Past activity has shown that pirates will also attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Despite the fact that attacks on merchant vessels appear to have decreased, the possibility of attacks and the successful pirating of sailing vessels remains likely due to their vulnerability and the reduction of revenue sources from merchant vessels.

As noted above, if an incident occurs, Masters are to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone at +971 50 55 23215 and provide as much accurate information as possible. This will ensure the information is quickly provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance. If Masters are safely able to take pictures and/or video of the suspicious activity, please provide these via email to UKMTO at ukmto@eim.ae, to the NSC (NATO Shipping Centre) at info@shipping.nato.int and to the Maritime Security Centre Horn of Africa (MSCHOA) at postmaster@mschoa.org. This information will be used by Counter Piracy forces to combat piracy activity.

Old Report

All 22 hostages from the MV Iceberg 1 have now been released from pirate captivity. They had been held since the Iceberg 1 was pirated on 29 March 2010, a period of two years and nine months. The former hostages are now recovering from their ordeal and are receiving food and medical care.

On 21 Dec 2012 at 0845Z, a vessel transiting in the Gulf of Oman (2322N; 05926E) was approached and chased by two skiffs for approximately 1.5 hours. Vessel was subsequently confirmed as safe. On 20 Dec 2012 at 1015Z, a vessel transiting in the Gulf of Oman was approached by a skiff reported in position 2449N; 05750E, with possibly armed personnel onboard. The skiff fell back and the vessel was reported safe.

The vessel reported hijacked from Bossaso anchorage on 18 Dec 2012 has returned to its previous position. This incident is no longer assessed as being piracy related. See Alert Update for NSC 028/12.

In addition to the incidents above, the NATO Shipping Centre has identified a new area of concern on the PAG map located within the Gulf of Oman.

Merchant vessels are advised to remain vigilant throughout the HRA and ensure that Self Protection Measures are in place as Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) are likely operating in the area. Sea states have been favourable to piracy over recent weeks. They are expected to become more marginal in the coming weeks with the onset of the Northeast monsoon. However, small boats will still be able to operate.

Old Report

Merchant vessels are advised to remain vigilant throughout the HRA and ensure that Self Protection Measures are in place as Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) are likely operating in the area. Sea states have been favourable to piracy over recent weeks. They are expected to become more marginal in the coming weeks with the onset of the Northeast monsoon. However, small boats will still be able to operate.

Any areas of concern will be posted to our PAG map. The PAG map is available on the NATO Shipping Centre website: http://www.shipping.nato.int

During the past few months there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the HRA. Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Counter Piracy Guidance

Masters are advised that the threat of piracy against merchant shipping is always present throughout the entire HRA and vessels are advised to ensure all necessary Self Protection Measures are implemented as recommended in BMP4. As per Section 5 of BMP4, early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the critical difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. NSC would like to remind masters that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining best possible vessel speed when transiting the HRA to deter pirate boardings.

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness. Somali pirates are in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection Measures.
Old Report

During the period from 28 November to 05 December, there were two piracy related events reported in the High Risk Area (HRA). These incidents were both assessed as suspicious activity and occurred in the Somali Basin and Arabian Sea. Merchant vessels are advised to remain vigilant throughout the HRA and ensure that Self Protection Measures are in place as Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) are likely operating in the area.

On Saturday, 01 December 12, four South Korean hostages, formally of the MT Gemini, were released from captivity.

Sea states have been favourable to piracy over recent weeks. They are expected to become more marginal in the coming weeks with the onset of the Northeast monsoon. However, small boats will still be able to operate.

Any areas of concern will be posted to our PAG map. The PAG map is available on the NATO Shipping Centre website: http://www.shipping.nato.int

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM)/Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

During the past few months there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the SRS, BAM and GOA.

Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

On the 28th of November a PAG comprising two skiffs with ladders was sighted in position 0640N 05905E. On the 29th of November a possible PAG comprising two skiffs was sighted south of Masirah Island. Despite the onset of the NE Monsoon, sea states have remained favourable for small boat activity in these regions.

It is important to note that fishing activity takes place regularly throughout the AS, SB, GOO & MC.

Old Report

During the period from 21-27 November 2012 there was one piracy related incident reported in the High Risk Area (HRA). This incident was assessed as suspicious activity and occurred off the coast in the Somali Basin. Subsequently, an area of concern was established in the vicinity. Merchant vessels are advised to remain vigilant throughout the HRA and ensure that Self Protection Measures are in place as Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) may be operating in the area.

Sea states remain favourable to piracy despite the approaching Northeast Monsoon although they are expected to increase in the coming weeks. Seasonal changes are not likely to be a severe hindrance to piracy in the HRA as small boats may still be capable of operating in these conditions.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM)/Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

During the past few months there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the SRS, BAM and GOA.

Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

These areas also see regular fishing activity.

Old Report

During the period from 14 November to 20 November, there was one piracy related incident reported in the High Risk Area (HRA), this incident was assessed as suspicious activity and occurred in the Somali Basin. Merchant vessels are advised to remain vigilant throughout the HRA and ensure that Self Protection Measures are in place, as Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) are likely operating in the area.
The Southwest Monsoon season has ended, however, sea states are expected to deteriorate again in the coming weeks with the onset of the Northeast monsoon.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM)/Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)
During the past few months there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the SRS, BAM and GOA.
Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.
Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

On 20 November, a possible PAG was sighted at position 0210N 05241E with a ladder onboard. There was also the interception of a skiff by counter piracy forces, during which equipment related to piracy was destroyed.

These areas also see regular fishing activity.

Old Report

During the period from 7 November to 13 November, there were no piracy related incidents reported in the High Risk Area (HRA). However, there have been continuing reports of suspicious activity. Merchant vessels are advised to remain vigilant throughout the HRA and ensure that Self Protection Measures are in place, as Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) are likely operating in the area.

The Southwest Monsoon season has ended. Calmer weather conditions are allowing PAGs to operate further out from shore.

Any areas of concern will be posted to our PAG map. The PAG map is available on the NATO Shipping Centre website: http://www.shipping.nato.int

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM)/Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

During the past few months there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the SRS, BAM and GOA.

Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

These areas also see suspicious activity and regular fishing activity.

Old Report

During the period from 31 October to 6 November, there were no piracy related incidents reported in the High Risk Area (HRA). However, there have been continuing reports of suspicious activity. Merchant vessels are advised to remain vigilant throughout the HRA and ensure that Self Protection Measures are in place, as Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) are likely operating in the area.

The Southwest Monsoon season has ended. Calmer weather conditions are allowing PAGs to operate further out from shore.

Any areas of concern will be posted to our PAG map. The PAG map is available on the NATO Shipping Centre website: http://www.shipping.nato.int

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM)/Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

During the past few months there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the SRS, BAM and GOA.

Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

These areas also see suspicious activity and regular fishing activity.

Old Report

During the period 24-30 Oct, there was one piracy related incident in the High Risk Area (HRA). On 24 Oct, a dhow Pirate Attack Group (PAG) was disrupted along the Somali coast.

There have also been continuing reports of suspicious activity. Merchant vessels are advised to remain vigilant throughout the HRA and ensure that Self Protection Measures are in place, as PAGs are likely operating in the area.

The Southwest Monsoon season has ended. Calmer weather conditions will allow PAGs to operate further out from shore.

Any areas of concern will be posted to our PAG map. The PAG map is available on the NATO Shipping Centre website: http://www.shipping.nato.int/

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM)/Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

During the past few months there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the SRS, BAM and GOA.

Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

As noted above, a dhow Pirate Attack Group (PAG) was disrupted along the Somali coast on 24 Oct.

Old Report

During the period of 17 to 23 October, there were two piracy related incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA): one attack and one disruption. There has also been continuing reports of suspicious activity. Merchant vessels are advised to remain vigilant throughout the HRA and ensure that Self Protection Measures are in place, as Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) are likely operating in the area.

The Southwest Monsoon season has ended. Calmer weather conditions will likely allow PAGs to operate further out from shore.

Any areas of concern will be posted to our Pirate Attack Group (PAG) map. The PAG map is available on the NATO Shipping Centre website: http://www.shipping.nato.int/

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM)/Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

On 19 October, an attack on a merchant vessel at position 13 47N 042 26E was reported as disrupted. However, it is likely that this PAG is still operating in this area.

During the past few months there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the SRS, BAM and GOA.

Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

A vessel was attacked by a PAG 60Nm NE of Eyl approximately 2Nm off the Somali Coast at position 08 52N 050 28E (NSC Alert 026/12). This incident was originally reported as a Hijack however it has now been confirmed that the vessel is safe.

On 22 Oct 2012 a merchant vessel reported suspicious activity at position 24 58N 060 17E. On the same day, a suspicious grey coloured dhow with blue lines was reported approximately 100nm east of Masirah, Oman.

Old Report

The pirated vessel Free Goddess was released on 11 October 2012.

During the period of 10 to 16 October, there was one piracy related incident in the High Risk Area (HRA). On 10 October 2012, there was one attack on a fishing vessel by a single skiff 360 nm southeast of Mogadishu in position 0026N-05039E (Alert 047/12). The fishing vessel is safe and the skiff responsible for this attack has since been disrupted.

Merchant vessels are advised to remain vigilant throughout the HRA and ensure that Self Protection Measures are in place, as Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) are likely operating in the area.

The Southwest Monsoon season has ended. Calmer weather conditions will likely allow PAGs to operate further out from shore.

Any areas of concern will be posted to our Pirate Attack Group (PAG) map. The PAG map is available on the NATO Shipping Centre website: http://www.shipping.nato.int/

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM)/Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

During the past few months there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the SRS, BAM and GOA.

Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

As noted above, there was an incident in the SB on 10 October 2012.

Old Report

During the period of 03 to 09 October, there were two piracy related incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA). At 0424 UTC on 09 Oct 2012, a merchant vessel reported an approach by one white-coloured skiff with 7-8 persons aboard at position 1318N-05717E (NSC 025/12). On the same day, at 0732 UTC, there was a further report of a skiff at 1314N-05720E with 6 persons and a ladder aboard.

Merchant vessels are advised to remain vigilant throughout the HRA and ensure that Self Protection Measures are in place, as it is a realistic possibility that Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) are operating in the area.

The Southwest Monsoon season has just ended. Improving weather conditions will likely allow PAGs to operate further out from shore.

Please see the PAG map for all areas of concern. The PAG map is available on the NATO Shipping Centre website: http://www.shipping.nato.int/

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM)/Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

During the past few months there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the SRS, BAM and GOA. Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

As noted above, there were two incidents in the AS on 09 October 2012.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Masters are advised that the threat of piracy against merchant shipping is always present throughout the entire HRA and vessels are advised to ensure all necessary Self Protection Measures are implemented as recommended in BMP4. As per Section 5 of BMP4, early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the critical difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. NSC would like to remind masters that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining best possible vessel speed when transiting the HRA to deter pirate boardings.

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness. Somali pirates are in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection Measures.

Both dhows and whalers can be used as motherships. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, eight-metre whalers are preferred, weather permitting. Information and photographs regarding known pirate motherships are available at http://www.shipping.nato.int/pages/motherships2.aspx. If you have any information regarding pirate motherships please send it to us on info@shipping.nato.int.

There have been a number of incidents recently reported to Counter Piracy organisations in the HRA involving small craft approaches to merchant vessels. Although these incidents may appear to be piracy related, the majority actually are not and have been assessed as non-piracy related activity common to the pattern of life in the area. This can include fishing, small vessel trade, smuggling and other local traffic. A large number of fishing vessels operate in the SRS, the BAM and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out using long lines by mechanized or single-hull boats which typically have outboard motors and carry 4-6 crew members. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.

Please note that, if we assess an approach or incident to be piracy, we will issue relevant warnings and alerts, keeping the merchant shipping community fully informed at all times.

It has been observed that some Masters are choosing to phone their Company Security Officer (CSO) first in the event of a piracy incident. However, one of the fundamental requirements of BMP4 is that UKMTO is the primary point of contact for merchant vessels during piracy incidents in the HRA. This aims to avoid unnecessary delay and prevent inaccurate or incomplete information from reaching military commanders. CSOs should ensure their ships’ security plans reinforce the BMP4 recommendation that UKMTO be immediately telephoned at +971 50 55 23215 in the event of any piracy activity. UKMTO will then make it a priority to contact the CSO with any information received whilst ensuring the relevant information reaches the military commanders with the minimum of delay.
Sailing yachts should avoid transiting the HRA. With the end of the Southwest Monsoon, the weather and sea states in the Indian Ocean and the Southern Red Sea will become more conducive to pirate activity. Past activity has shown that pirates will also attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Despite the fact that attacks on merchant vessels appear to have decreased, the possibility of attacks and the successful pirating of sailing vessels remains likely due to their vulnerability and the reduction of revenue sources from merchant vessels.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 26 September to 02 October 2012 there were no piracy related incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA). In the period we received one report of suspicious activity in the Southern Red Sea (SRS) Bab-al-Mandeb (BAM) and Gulf of Aden (GOA). Masters are still reminded to remain vigilant while transiting this area.
The Southwest Monsoon season is currently in transition. Improving weather conditions will likely allow pirates to operate further out from shore. Note that pirate activity can still take place during the monsoon season: during this time pirates are likely to operate closer to shore to avoid severe conditions further out at sea. Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) will likely continue to focus their efforts in the Northern Arabian Sea (NAS), Gulf of Oman (GOO) as well as in the Gulf of Aden (GOA), Southern Red Sea (SRS), and coastal waters.
Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map. PAG map is also available on the NSC website: http://www.shipping.nato.int/
Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM)/Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)
During the past two months there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the SRS, BAM and GOA. Due to weather conditions in the area, PAGs may move to operate in these less-exposed or coastal areas.
Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)
There have been no significant changes over the past week.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 19 September to 25 September 2012, there was one reported piracy-related incident in the High Risk Area (HRA), an attack reported in the Arabian Sea.

Specific areas of suspected and known Pirate Attack Group (PAG) locations can be found on our PAG map. PAG map is also available on the NSC website: http://www.shipping.nato.int/

The Southwest Monsoon season is now ending. Improving weather conditions are allowing small boats such as skiffs to operate in more exposed and coastal areas such as the SRS, the GOA and the BAM. Sea conditions in the High Risk Area (HRA) continue to become more favourable for PAGs to operate.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM)/Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

There have been continued reports of suspicious activity in the Southern Red Sea (SRS), Bab-al-Mandeb (BAM) and the Gulf of Aden (GOA) during the past few weeks.

Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

There was a reported piracy attack in the Arabian Sea, approximately 110 nm SE of the Omani port of Salalah. This report could not be confirmed.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Masters are advised that the threat of piracy against merchant shipping is always present throughout the entire HRA and vessels are advised to ensure all necessary Self Protection Measures are implemented as recommended in BMP4. As per Section 5 of BMP4, early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the critical difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. NSC would like to remind masters that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining best possible vessel speed when transiting the HRA to deter pirate boardings.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 12 September to 18 September 2012 there have been no piracy related incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA). However, there have been continued reports of suspicious activity in the Southern Red Sea (SRS), Bab-al-Mandeb (BAM) and the Gulf of Aden (GOA) during the past few weeks.

The Southwest Monsoon season is in transition during the coming weeks. Improving weather conditions will likely allow pirates to operate further out from shore. Note that pirate activity can still take place during the monsoon season. During this time, pirates are likely to operate closer to shore to avoid severe conditions further out to sea. Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) will likely continue to focus their efforts in the Northern Arabian Sea (NAS), Gulf of Oman (GOO) as well as in the GOA, the SRS, the BAM and in coastal waters.

Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map. PAG map is also available on the NSC website: http://www.shipping.nato.int/

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM)/Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

During the past month there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the SRS, BAM and GOA. Due to weather conditions in the area, PAGs may move to operate in these less-exposed or coastal areas.

Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates. 

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

Old Report SEPT 5 – 12

WEST AFRICA

NIGERIA: Oil tanker fired upon while underway on 9 September at 06: 09 N – 002: 53 E, approximately 34 nm south west of Lagos travelling from Lome to Lagos. Unknown number of pirates fired several shots at underway vessel in an attempted boarding event. Non-essential crew mustered in citadel and the vessel utilized evasive action to evade the attacking vessel. Pirates attempted to board the vessel several times but after a 20 minute chase the hostile vessel broke off pursuit. No damage to vessel or injuries to the crew, but several bullets did hit the vessel superstructure. Nigerian Navy deployed an escort while the tanker anchored off Lagos. (IMO/IMB)

INDIAN OCEAN–EAST AFRICA

INDIA: Chemical tanker hijacked on 7 September near 21: 40 N – 088: 01 E, Sagar Anchorage, Haldia. Four armed robbers carrying knives and rods boarded a chemical tanker from the aft while vessel was at anchor. Duty crew members spotted the robbers and immediately informed the Chief Officer and Master. The alarm was raised and the crew was mustered. The crew did not sustain any injury, however the robbers escaped with four mooring ropes. The event was reported to the Indian Coast Guard. (IMO/IMB)

INDONESIA – Container vessel boarded on 11 September at 03: 54 N – 098: 46 E, Belawan Anchorage. Five robbers approached the anchored container ship in a small boat. Two robbers subsequently boarded the vessel and proceeded to break into the forward storeroom, stealing ship’s property. Upon seeing vessel crewmembers approaching the robbers escaped. Port control was informed of the event. (IMO)

INDONESIA – LPG tanker boarded on 8 September at 05:34 S – 104:36 E, Teluk Semangka Anchorage. Five armed robbers carrying sticks approached the vessel in a small fishing boat and boarded it. The duty crew noticed the robbers and informed bridge who raised the alarm and the crew was mustered. Upon hearing the alarm, the robbers quickly left the vessel empty handed. Port control was informed of the event. (IMB)

INDONESIA – Chemical tanker boarded on 3 September at 03:55 N – 098:46 E, Belawan Anchorage. Six armed robbers caring guns and knives boarded an anchored chemical tanker using hook attached to a bamboo pole. A crewman noticed the robbers and attempted to contact the bridge via his walkie-talkie but the robbers seized it, took him as a hostage and tied him up. While the robbers were stealing ship’s stores and properties, the crewman was able to free himself and raise the alarm. Upon hearing the alarm, the robbers escaped with the stolen items. Port control was informed of the event. (IMB)

Old Report

During the reporting period of 29 August to 4 September 2012 there have been no piracy related incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA). However, there have been continued reports of suspicious activity in the Southern Red Sea (SRS) and Bab-al-Mandeb (BAM) during the past week.

Pirate activity can still take place during the Southwest Monsoon season. It should be noted that pirates are likely operating closer to shore to avoid severe conditions further out to sea. Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) will likely continue to focus their efforts in the Northern Arabian Sea (NAS), Gulf of Oman (GOO) as well as in the Gulf of Aden (GOA), Southern Red Sea (SRS), and coastal waters.

Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map. PAG map is also available on the NSC website: http://www.shipping.nato.int/

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM)/Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

During the past month there have been continued reports concerning suspicious activity in the SRS and BAM. Due to weather conditions in the area, PAGs may move to operate in less-exposed or coastal areas such as the SRS, GOA or BAM.

Fishing activity is expected to continue in this area during the Southwest Monsoon season. Fishermen may carry small arms. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order to distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

There have been no significant changes over the past week.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 15 to 21 August 2012, there have no piracy related incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA). Pirate activity can still take place during the South-West Monsoon. It should be noted that pirates are likely operating closer to shore to avoid severe conditions further out to sea.   Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) will likely continue to focus their efforts in the Northern Arabian Sea (NAS), Gulf of Oman (GOO) as well as in the Gulf of Aden (GOA), Southern Red Sea (SRS), and coastal waters. 

Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map. PAG map is also available on the NSC website: http://www.shipping.nato.int/

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

A number of reports concerning suspicious activity have been received during the past month in the Southern Red Sea (SRS) and Bab-al-Mandeb (BAM). Due to weather conditions in the area, PAGs may move to operate in less-exposed or coastal areas such as the SRS, GOA or BAM.

Fishing activity is expected to continue and likely increase in this area during the Southwest monsoon season. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

There have been no significant changes over the past week. On 17 August 2012, MSCHOA issued Alert 046 /12 and then cancelled it later that day after the situation was confirmed to be non-piracy related.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 08 to 14 August 2012, there have been two dhows pirated (NSC Alert 023/12) and one disruption in the High Risk Area.
Pirate activity can still take place during the South-West Monsoon. It should be noted that pirates are likely operating closer to shore to avoid severe conditions further out to sea. Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) will likely continue to focus their efforts in the Northern Arabian Sea (NAS), Gulf of Oman (GOO) as well as in the Gulf of Aden (GOA), Southern Red Sea (SRS), and coastal waters.
Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map. PAG map is also available on the NSC website: http://www.shipping.nato.int/
Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)
On 13 August 2012 at 1513Z, a dhow PAG was disrupted at position 1131N 04952E by a NATO warship in co-operation with an EU warship. The dhow is no longer under pirate control and its crew members are reported safe. Six pirates have been apprehended and remain in Counter Piracy forces custody. This dhow had been pirated on 11 August 2012. The pirates seized it after abandoning a dhow they had previously pirated near Bosasso on 09 August 2012.
A number of reports concerning suspicious activity have been received during the past three weeks in the Southern Red Sea (SRS) and Bab-al-Mandeb (BAM). Due to weather conditions in the area, PAGs may move to operate in less-exposed or coastal areas such as the SRS, GOA or BAM.
Fishing activity is expected to continue and likely increase in this area during the Southwest monsoon season. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.
Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)
There have been no significant changes over the past week.
Counter Piracy Guidance Update
Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness, though are currently impeded by the South-West Monsoon. Somali pirates are in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection Measures.
Both dhows and whalers are being used as motherships. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred, weather permitting. Information and photographs regarding known pirate motherships are available at http://www.shipping.nato.int/pages/motherships2.aspx. If you have any information regarding pirate motherships please e-mail info@shipping.nato.int.
There have been a number of incidents recently reported to Counter Piracy organisations in the High Risk Area involving small craft approaches to Merchant Vessels. Although these incidents may appear to be piracy related, the majority are not, and have been assessed as non-piracy related activity common to the pattern of life in the area. This can include fishing, small vessel trade, smuggling and other local traffic.
Please note that, if we assess an approach or incident to be piracy, we will issue relevant warnings and alerts, keeping the merchant shipping community fully informed at all times.
Somali pirates operating in this area are looking to pirate merchant ships, yet past activity has shown that pirates will also attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Larger yachts with more people onboard or a group of yachts could be seen as a valuable and easy target for the pirates. For more information, please read the Let your Yacht take the ferry document located in the “Important Messages” section on the NSC website main page.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 01 to 07 Aug 2012, there has been one report of suspicious activity (NSC Daily Piracy Update 06 Aug) in the High Risk Area.
Pirate activity can still take place during the South-West Monsoon. It should be noted that pirates are likely operating closer to shore to avoid severe conditions further out to sea. Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) will likely continue to focus their efforts in the Northern Arabian Sea (NAS), Gulf of Oman (GOO) as well as in the Gulf of Aden (GOA), Southern Red Sea (SRS), and coastal waters.
Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map.
Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)
On 05 Aug 12 a merchant vessel reported a possible PAG in the vicinity of 13 21N 042 48E.
A number of reports concerning suspicious activity have been received during the past two weeks in the Southern Red Sea (SRS) and Bab-al-Mandeb (BAM). Due to weather conditions in the area, PAGs may move to operate in less-exposed or coastal areas such as the SRS, Gulf of Aden (GOA) or BAM.
Fishing activity is expected to continue and likely increase in this area during the Southwest monsoon season. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.
Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)
There have been no significant changes over the past week.
Counter Piracy Guidance Update
Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness, though are currently impeded by the South-West Monsoon. Somali pirates are in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection Measures.
Both dhows and whalers are being used as motherships. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred. Information and photographs regarding known pirate motherships is available at http://www.shipping.nato.int/pages/motherships2.aspx. If you have any information regarding pirate motherships please e-mail info@shipping.nato.int.
There have been a number of incidents recently reported to Counter Piracy organisations in the High Risk Area involving small craft approaches to Merchant Vessels. Although these incidents may appear to be piracy related, the majority are not, and have been assessed as non-piracy related activity common to the pattern of life in the area. This can include fishing, small vessel trade, smuggling and other local traffic.
Please note that, if we assess an approach or incident to be piracy, then we will issue relevant warnings and alerts, keeping the merchant shipping community fully informed at all times.
Somali pirates operating in this area are looking to pirate merchant ships, yet past activity has shown that pirates will also attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Larger yachts with more people onboard or a group of yachts could be seen as a valuable and easy target for the pirates. For more information, please read the Let your Yacht take the ferry document located in the “Important Messages” section on the NSC website main page.
It has been observed that some Masters are choosing to phone their Company Security Officer (CSO) first in the event of a piracy incident. One of the fundamental requirements of BMP4 states that UKMTO is the primary point of contact for merchant vessels during piracy incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA) which should avoid unnecessary delay and possible inaccurate or incomplete information reaching military commanders. CSOs should ensure their ships’ security plan reinforces the BMP4 recommendation that UKMTO should be telephoned at +971 50 55 23215 in the event of any piracy activity. UKMTO will then make every effort to contact the CSO as a matter of priority with any information received, whilst ensuring the relevant information reaches the military commanders with the minimum of delay.
When navigating throughout the entire region of the HRA, masters are reminded of the need for continued adherence to Best Management Practices 4 (BMP4). As per Section 5 of BMP4, early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended. Masters are advised that the threat of piracy against merchant shipping is always present throughout the entire HRA, and are advised to ensure all necessary Self Protection Measures are implemented as recommended in BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. NSC would like to remind masters that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the High Risk Area (HRA) to prevent pirate boardings.
Masters are also reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea, Bab al-Mandeb and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out by mechanized or single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew using long lines. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.
As noted above, if an incident occurs, Masters are to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone +971 50 55 23215 and provide as much information as possible and as accurate regarding the incident. This will ensure the information is quickly provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance. If Masters are safely able to take pictures and/or video of the suspicious activity, please provide these via email to UKMTO at ukmto@eim.ae, NSC (NATO Shipping Centre) at info@shipping.nato.int and Maritime Security Centre Horn of Africa (MSCHOA) at postmaster@mschoa.org. This information will be used by Counter Piracy forces to combat piracy activity.
Weekly Pirated Vessels Update
NUMBER OF SHIPS: 7 (Does not include Dhow and Fishing Vessels) COMBINED TOTAL NUMBER OF HOSTAGES: 177
Name Flag Date Pirated Crew
1) ICEBERG 1 Panama 29-Mar-10 22
2) ALBEDO Malaysia 25-Nov-10 15
3) ORNA Panama 20-Dec-10 19
4) FREE GODDESS Liberia 07-Feb-12 21
5) ROYAL GRACE Panama 02-Mar-12 22
6) NAHAM 3 Oman 26-Mar-12 29
7) SMYRNI Liberia 10-May-12 26
TOTAL: 154
HOSTAGES WITHOUT VESSEL
Ex FV PRANTALAY 18-Apr-10 4
Ex MV LEOPARD 12-Jan-11 6
Ex MV ASPHALT 16-Apr-11 7
Ex MV Gemini 30-Apr-11 4
Ex FV Aride 29-Oct-11 2
TOTAL: 23

Old Report

During the reporting period of 25 July to 31 July 2012, there has been one suspicious activity (NSC 022/12) incident in the High Risk Area.

Pirate activity can still take place during the South-West Monsoon. It should be noted that pirates are likely operating closer to shore to avoid severe conditions further out to sea. Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) will likely continue to focus their efforts in the Northern Arabian Sea (NAS), Gulf of Oman (GOO) as well as in the Gulf of Aden (GOA), Southern Red Sea (SRS), and coastal waters.

Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

At 0700Z 31 July 2012 a merchant vessel reported (NSC 022/12) approximately 3 suspicious skiffs with ladders aboard at position 12 21N 043 59E in Bab-al-Mandeb (BAM). Each skiff had 3-5 people on board.

A number of reports concerning suspicious activity have been received during the last week in the Southern Red Sea (SRS). Due to weather conditions in the area, PAGs may move to operate in less-exposed or coastal areas such as the SRS, Gulf of Aden (GOA) or Bab-al-Mandeb (BAM).

Fishing activity is expected to continue and likely increase in this area during the Southwest monsoon season. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

There have been no significant changes over the past week.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness, though are currently impeded by the South-West Monsoon. Somali pirates are in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection Measures.

Both dhows and whalers are being used as motherships. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred. Information and photographs regarding known pirate motherships is available at http://www.shipping.nato.int/pages/motherships2.aspx. If you have any information regarding pirate motherships please e-mail info@shipping.nato.int.

There have been a number of incidents recently reported to Counter Piracy organisations in the High Risk Area involving small craft approaches to Merchant Vessels. Although these incidents may appear to be piracy related, the majority are not, and have been assessed as non-piracy related activity common to the pattern of life in the area. This can include fishing, small vessel trade, smuggling and other local traffic.

Please note that, if we assess an approach or incident to be piracy, then we will issue relevant warnings and alerts, keeping the merchant shipping community fully informed at all times.

Somali pirates operating in this area are looking to pirate merchant ships, yet past activity has shown that pirates will also attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Larger yachts with more people onboard or a group of yachts could be seen as a valuable and easy target for the pirates. For more information, please read the Let your Yacht take the ferry document located in the “Important Messages” section on the NSC website main page.

It has been observed that some Masters are choosing to phone their Company Security Officer (CSO) first in the event of a piracy incident. One of the fundamental requirements of BMP4 states that UKMTO is the primary point of contact for merchant vessels during piracy incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA) which should avoid unnecessary delay and possible inaccurate or incomplete information reaching military commanders. CSOs should ensure their ships’ security plan reinforces the BMP4 recommendation that UKMTO should be telephoned at +971 50 55 23215 in the event of any piracy activity. UKMTO will then make every effort to contact the CSO as a matter of priority with any information received, whilst ensuring the relevant information reaches the military commanders with the minimum of delay.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 18 July to 24 July 2012, there have been no piracy incidents in the High Risk Area.

Pirate activity can still take place during the South-West Monsoon. It should be noted that pirates are likely operating closer to shore to avoid severe conditions further out to sea.

Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) will likely continue to focus their efforts in the Northern Arabian Sea (NAS), Gulf of Oman (GOO) as well as in the Gulf of Aden (GOA), Southern Red Sea (SRS), and coastal waters.

Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

Fishing activity is expected to continue and likely increase in this area during the Southwest monsoon season. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

A dhow pirated by a small white craft on approximately 19 June at location 0724N 05230E in the Somali Basin, was released approximately 13 July at position 1030N 05720E South East of Socotra Island. This incident is not linked with any alert posted on NSC website due to the timeline and delay in reporting.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness, though are currently impeded by the South-West Monsoon. Somali pirates are in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection Measures.

Both dhows and whalers are being used as motherships. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred. Information and photographs regarding known pirate motherships is available at http://www.shipping.nato.int/pages/motherships2.aspx. If you have any information regarding pirate motherships please e-mail info@shipping.nato.int.

There have been a number of incidents recently reported to Counter Piracy organisations in the High Risk Area involving small craft approaches to Merchant Vessels. Although these incidents may appear to be piracy related, the majority are not, and have been assessed as non-piracy related activity common to the pattern of life in the area. This can include fishing, small vessel trade, smuggling and other local traffic.

Please note that, if we assess an approach or incident to be piracy, then we will issue relevant warnings and alerts, keeping the merchant shipping community fully informed at all times.

Somali pirates operating in this area are looking to pirate merchant ships, yet past activity has shown that pirates will also attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Larger yachts with more people onboard or a group of yachts could be seen as a valuable and easy target for the pirates.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 04 to 10 July 2012 there have been no piracy incidents in the region.

Activity in recent weeks shows that pirate activity can still take place during the South-West Monsoon and that pirates are operating closer to shore to avoid severe conditions further out to sea. PAGs (Pirate Attack Groups) will likely continue to focus their efforts in the Northern Arabian Sea (NAS), Gulf of Oman (GOO) as well as in the Gulf of Aden (GOA), Southern Red Sea (SRS), and coastal waters.

Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/PAGmap.aspx

Details of all past alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx

Old Report

During the reporting period of 28 June to 04 July 2012 one Pirate Attack Group was disrupted in the region. Details of all alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx

Activity over the past two weeks shows that pirate activity can still take place during the South-West Monsoon and that pirates are operating closer to shore to avoid severe conditions further out to sea. PAGs (Pirate Attack Groups) will likely continue to focus their efforts in the Northern Arabian Sea (NAS), Gulf of Oman (GOO) as well as in the Gulf of Aden (GOA), Southern Red Sea (SRS), and coastal waters.

Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx

There have been a number of incidents recently reported to Counter Piracy organisations in the High Risk Area involving small craft approaches to Merchant Vessels. Although these incidents may appear to be piracy related, the majority are not, and have been assessed as non-piracy related activity common to the pattern of life in the area. This can include fishing, small vessel trade, smuggling and other local traffic.
Please note that, if we assess an approach or incident to be piracy, then we will issue relevant warnings and alerts, keeping the merchant shipping community fully informed at all times.

During the South-West monsoon between June and September, sea conditions in much of the High Risk Area (HRA) are expected to be largely unfavourable to small boats such as skiffs. These may move to operate in less-exposed or coastal areas such as the Gulf of Aden or Bab-al-Mandeb.

Please remain vigilant at all times.

If an incident occurs, Masters are advised to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone at +971 50 55 23215, providing as much information as possible about the incident. This will ensure information is quickly passed to shipping in the area.

If Masters are able to take pictures and/or video of the suspicious activity safely, please provide these via email to UKMTO at ukmto@eim.ae, NATO Shipping Centre (NSC) at info@shipping.nato.int or the Maritime Security Centre Horn of Africa (MSCHOA) at postmaster@mschoa.org. This information will be used by Counter Piracy forces to help combat piracy. Pictures supplied from a recent attack on a merchant vessel led to the rapid release of a pirated dhow.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

On 29 June 2012 a dhow Pirate Attack Group (PAG) was disrupted at position 14 02N 051 25E approximately 145nm North West of Socotra Island. This is the same dhow which attacked a merchant vessel on 27 Jun at position 14 23N 054 38E. Pictures supplied from the merchant vessel during this recent attack led to the rapid release of this pirated dhow.

Fishing activity is expected to continue and likely to increase in this area during the Southwest monsoon season. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

There have been no significant changes over the past week.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness, though are currently impeded by the South-West Monsoon. Somali pirates are in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection Measures.

Both dhows and whalers are being used as motherships. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred. Information and photographs regarding known pirate motherships is available at http://www.shipping.nato.int/pages/motherships2.aspx. If you have any information regarding pirate motherships please e-mail info@shipping.nato.int.

Somali pirates operating in this area are looking to pirate merchant ships, yet past activity has shown that pirates will also attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Larger yachts with more people onboard or a group of yachts could be seen as a valuable and easy target for the pirates. For more information, please read the Let your Yacht take the ferry document located in the “Important Messages” section on the NSC website main page.

It has been observed recently that some Masters are choosing to phone their Company Security Officer (CSO) first in the event of a piracy incident. One of the fundamental requirements of BMP4 states that UKMTO is the primary point of contact for merchant vessels during piracy incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA) which should avoid unnecessary delay and possible inaccurate or incomplete information reaching military commanders. CSOs should ensure their ships’ security plan reinforces the BMP4 recommendation that UKMTO should be telephoned on +971 50 55 23215 in the event of any piracy activity. UKMTO will then make every effort to contact the CSO as a matter of priority with any information received, whilst ensuring the relevant information reaches the military commanders with the minimum of delay.

When navigating throughout the entire region of the HRA, masters are reminded of the need for continued adherence to Best Management Practices 4 (BMP4). As per Section 5 of BMP4 , early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended. Masters are advised that the threat of piracy against merchant shipping is always present throughout the entire HRA, and are advised to ensure all necessary Self Protection Measures are implemented as recommended in BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. NSC would like to remind masters that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the High Risk Area (HRA) to prevent pirate boardings.

Masters are also reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea, Bab al-Mandeb and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out by mechanized or single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew using long lines. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 21 to 27 June 2012 one merchant vessel was attacked by pirates and two dhows were released from pirate control. Details of all alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage:http://www.shipping.nato.int

Due to the South-West monsoon between June and September, sea conditions in the HRA are expected to be generally unfavourable for small boats. Activity over the past two weeks shows that pirate activity can still take place during the South-West Monsoon and that pirates are operating closer to shore to avoid severe conditions further out to sea. PAGs (Pirate Attack Groups) will likely continue to focus their efforts in the Northern Arabian Sea (NAS), Gulf of Oman (GOO) as well as in the Gulf of Aden (GOA), Southern Red Sea (SRS), and coastal waters.

Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map: http://www.shipping.nato.int

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

A suspected PAG is currently operating in this area.

On 25 June 2012 the dhow pirated on 21 April 2012 was released from pirate control near Mukalla, Yemen.

Fishing activity is expected to continue and likely to increase in this area during the Southwest monsoon season. Masters are reminded to remain vigilant in order distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

A dhow PAG is currently operating in this area.

On 1015Z 27 June 2012 a merchant vessel was attacked at position 1423N 054 38E by pirates aboard a brown coloured dhow with a white superstructure. The vessel is SAFE.

A dhow was pirated at position 20 29N 059 03E on 20 June 2012 by 8 pirates aboard 1 skiff working with a mothership. This dhow was released from pirate control on 26 June 2012. Reports also indicate that after the capture on 20 June 2012 the pirates may have left this dhow to hunt for other vessels.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness, though are currently impeded by the South-West Monsoon. Somali pirates are in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection Measures.

Both dhows and whalers are being used as motherships. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred. Information and photographs regarding known pirate motherships is available at http://www.shipping.nato.int/pages/motherships2.aspx. If you have any information regarding pirate motherships please e-mail info@shipping.nato.int.

Somali pirates operating in this area are looking to pirate merchant ships, yet past activity has shown that pirates will also attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Larger yachts with more people onboard or a group of yachts could be seen as a valuable and easy target for the pirates. For more information, please read the Let your Yacht take the ferry document located in the “Important Messages” section on the NSC website main page.

It has been observed recently that some Masters are choosing to phone their Company Security Officer (CSO) first in the event of a piracy incident. One of the fundamental requirements of BMP4 states that UKMTO is the primary point of contact for merchant vessels during piracy incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA) which should avoid unnecessary delay and possible inaccurate or incomplete information reaching military commanders. CSOs should ensure their ships’ security plan reinforces the BMP4 recommendation that UKMTO should be telephoned on +971 50 55 23215 in the event of any piracy activity. UKMTO will then make every effort to contact the CSO as a matter of priority with any information received, whilst ensuring the relevant information reaches the military commanders with the minimum of delay.

When navigating throughout the entire region of the HRA, masters are reminded of the need for continued adherence to Best Management Practices 4 (BMP4). As per Section 5 of BMP4 , early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended. Masters are advised that the threat of piracy against merchant shipping is always present throughout the entire HRA, and are advised to ensure all necessary Self Protection Measures are implemented as recommended in BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. NSC would like to remind masters that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the High Risk Area (HRA) to prevent pirate boarding’s.

Masters are also reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea, Bab al-Mandeb and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out by mechanized or single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew using long lines. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.

As noted above, if an incident occurs, Masters are to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone and provide as much information as possible and as accurate regarding the incident. This will ensure the information is quickly provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance. If Masters are safely able to take pictures and/or video of the suspicious activity, please provide these via email to UKMTO at ukmto@eim.ae, NSC (NATO Shipping Centre) at info@shipping.nato.int and Maritime Security Centre Horn of Africa (MSCHOA) at postmaster@mschoa.org. This information will be used by Counter Piracy forces to combat piracy activity.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 14 to 20 June 2012 there have been two pirate attacks in the High Risk Area (HRA). This increase of attacks within the past week is evidence that pirate activity can still take place during the South-West Monsoon and Masters should remain vigilant to this threat.

Details of all alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx

Specific areas of suspected and known PAG (Pirate Attack Group) locations can be found on our PAG map: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx

Due to the South-West monsoon between June and September, sea conditions in the HRA are expected to be generally unfavourable for small boats. PAGs will likely continue to focus their efforts in the Northern Arabian Sea (NAS), Gulf of Oman (GOO) as well as in the Gulf of Aden (GOA) and South Red Sea (SRS).

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

On 18 Jun 2012 a merchant vessel was attacked by 3 skiffs at position 14 28 N 050 45 E. Each skiff had 5-6 persons on board. Small arms and Rocket Propelled Grenades (RPGs) were used against the merchant vessel.

Masters are advised that fishing activity is expected to continue and likely increase in this area during the Southwest monsoon season.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

Early morning 20 Jun 2012 a merchant vessel was attacked by 1 skiff with 5-6 persons aboard at position 20 50N 059 30E. The skiff fired upon the vessel with small arms at a distance of 1nm. Rocket Propelled Grenades (RPGs) were also seen aboard the skiff.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness, though are currently impeded by the South-West Monsoon. Somali pirates are in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection Measures.

Both dhows and whalers are being used as motherships. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred. Information and photographs regarding known pirate motherships is available at http://www.shipping.nato.int/pages/motherships2.aspx . If you have any information regarding pirate motherships please e-mail info@shipping.nato.int .

Somali pirates operating in this area are looking to pirate merchant ships, yet past activity has shown that pirates will also attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Larger yachts with more people onboard or a group of yachts could be seen as a valuable and easy target for the pirates. For more information, please read the Let your Yacht take the ferry document located in the “New on the Web Page” section on the NSC website main page.

Early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended, as per Section 5 of BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. NSC would like to remind masters that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the High Risk Area (HRA) to prevent pirate boardings.

Masters are reminded of the need for continued adherence to Best Management Practices 4 (BMP4) when navigating throughout the entire region of the HRA. Masters are advised that the threat of piracy against merchant shipping is always present throughout the entire HRA, and are advised to ensure all necessary Self Protection Measures are implemented as recommended in BMP4. Prudent and timely application of BMP4 can make the difference between being approached, attacked or pirated. Please be reminded that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the HRA to prevent being pirated.

It has been observed recently that some Masters are choosing to phone their Company Security Officer (CSO) first in the event of a piracy incident. One of the fundamental requirements of BMP4 states that UKMTO is the primary point of contact for merchant vessels during piracy incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA) which should avoid unnecessary delay and possible inaccurate or incomplete information reaching military commanders. CSOs should ensure their ships’ security plan reinforces the BMP4 recommendation that UKMTO should be telephoned on +971 50 55 23215 in the event of any piracy activity. UKMTO will then make every effort to contact the CSO as a matter of priority with any information received, whilst ensuring the relevant information reaches the military commanders with the minimum of delay.

Masters are also reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea, Bab al-Mandeb and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out by mechanized or single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew using long lines. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.

As noted above, if an incident occurs, Masters are to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone and provide as much information as possible and as accurate regarding the incident.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 07 to 13 June 2012 the number of piracy incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA) has remained low, with no piracy incident reported.

Specific areas of suspected and known PAG (Pirate Attack Group) locations can be found on our PAG map: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx
Due to the South-West monsoon between June and September, sea conditions in the HRA are expected to be generally unfavourable for small boats. PAG will likely continue to focus their limited efforts in the Northern Arabian Sea (NAS), Gulf of Oman (GOO) as well as in the Gulf of Aden (GOA) and South Red Sea (SRS).

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

There have been no significant changes over the past week. Masters are advised that fishing activity is expected to continue and likely increase in this area over the next few months.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

There have been no significant changes over last week in this region.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness. Somali pirates are in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection measures.

Both dhows and whalers are being used as motherships. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred. Details of all alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx

Somali pirates operating in this area are looking to pirate merchant ships, yet past activity has shown that pirates will attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Larger yachts with more people onboard or a group of yachts could be seen as a valuable and easy target for the pirates. For more information, please read the Let your Yacht take the ferry document located in the “New on the Web Page” section on the NSC website main page.

Early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended, as per Section 5 of BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. NSC would like to remind masters that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the High Risk Area (HRA) to prevent pirate boardings.

Masters are reminded of the need for continued adherence to Best Management Practices 4 (BMP4) when navigating throughout the entire region of the HRA. Masters are advised that the threat of piracy against merchant shipping is always present throughout the entire HRA, and are advised to ensure all necessary Self Protection Measures are implemented as recommended in BMP4. Prudent and timely application of BMP4 can make the difference between being approached, attacked or pirated. Please be reminded that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the HRA to prevent being pirated.

It has been observed recently that some Masters are choosing to phone their Company Security Officer (CSO) first in the event of a piracy incident. One of the fundamental requirements of BMP4 states that UKMTO is the primary point of contact for merchant vessels during piracy incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA) which should avoid unnecessary delay and possible inaccurate or incomplete information reaching military commanders. CSOs should ensure their ships’ security plan reinforces the BMP4 recommendation that UKMTO should be telephoned on +971 50 55 23215 in the event of any piracy activity. UKMTO will then make every effort to contact the CSO as a matter of priority with any information received, whilst ensuring the relevant information reaches the military commanders with the minimum of delay.

Masters are also reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea, Bab al-Mandeb and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out by mechanized or single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew using long lines. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.

As noted above, if an incident occurs, Masters are to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone and provide as much information as possible and as accurate regarding the incident. This will ensure the information is quickly provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance. If Masters are safely able to take pictures and/or video of the suspicious activity, please provide these via email to UKMTO at ukmto@eim.ae, NSC (NATO Shipping Centre) at info@shipping.nato.int and Maritime Security Centre Horn of Africa (MSCHOA) at postmaster@mschoa.org. This information will be used by Counter Piracy forces to combat piracy activity.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 07 to 13 June 2012 the number of piracy incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA) has remained low, with no piracy incident reported.

Specific areas of suspected and known PAG (Pirate Attack Group) locations can be found on our PAG map: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx
Due to the South-West monsoon between June and September, sea conditions in the HRA are expected to be generally unfavourable for small boats. PAG will likely continue to focus their limited efforts in the Northern Arabian Sea (NAS), Gulf of Oman (GOO) as well as in the Gulf of Aden (GOA) and South Red Sea (SRS).

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

There have been no significant changes over the past week. Masters are advised that fishing activity is expected to continue and likely increase in this area over the next few months.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

There have been no significant changes over last week in this region.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness. Somali pirates are in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection measures.

Both dhows and whalers are being used as motherships. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred. Details of all alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx

Somali pirates operating in this area are looking to pirate merchant ships, yet past activity has shown that pirates will attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Larger yachts with more people onboard or a group of yachts could be seen as a valuable and easy target for the pirates. For more information, please read the Let your Yacht take the ferry document located in the “New on the Web Page” section on the NSC website main page.

Early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended, as per Section 5 of BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. NSC would like to remind masters that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the High Risk Area (HRA) to prevent pirate boardings.

Masters are reminded of the need for continued adherence to Best Management Practices 4 (BMP4) when navigating throughout the entire region of the HRA. Masters are advised that the threat of piracy against merchant shipping is always present throughout the entire HRA, and are advised to ensure all necessary Self Protection Measures are implemented as recommended in BMP4. Prudent and timely application of BMP4 can make the difference between being approached, attacked or pirated. Please be reminded that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the HRA to prevent being pirated.

It has been observed recently that some Masters are choosing to phone their Company Security Officer (CSO) first in the event of a piracy incident. One of the fundamental requirements of BMP4 states that UKMTO is the primary point of contact for merchant vessels during piracy incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA) which should avoid unnecessary delay and possible inaccurate or incomplete information reaching military commanders. CSOs should ensure their ships’ security plan reinforces the BMP4 recommendation that UKMTO should be telephoned on +971 50 55 23215 in the event of any piracy activity. UKMTO will then make every effort to contact the CSO as a matter of priority with any information received, whilst ensuring the relevant information reaches the military commanders with the minimum of delay.

Masters are also reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea, Bab al-Mandeb and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out by mechanized or single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew using long lines. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.

As noted above, if an incident occurs, Masters are to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone and provide as much information as possible and as accurate regarding the incident. This will ensure the information is quickly provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance. If Masters are safely able to take pictures and/or video of the suspicious activity, please provide these via email to UKMTO at ukmto@eim.ae, NSC (NATO Shipping Centre) at info@shipping.nato.int and Maritime Security Centre Horn of Africa (MSCHOA) at postmaster@mschoa.org. This information will be used by Counter Piracy forces to combat piracy activity.

To read the previous weekly updates please click here…

Old Report

During the reporting period of 31 May to 06 June 2012 the number of piracy incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA) has remained low, with only one pirate approach reported.

Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx

Due to the South-West monsoon between June and September, sea conditions in the High Risk Area are expected to become generally unfavourable for small boats.

The NATO Shipping Centre’s June newsletter is now available. To view the newsletter please click on the following link:

http://www.shipping.nato.int/Newsletters/Newsletter%20June%202012.pdf
Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

There have been no significant changes over the past week. Masters are advised that fishing activity is expected to continue and likely increase in this area over the next few months.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

There have been no significant changes over last week in this region.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness. Somali pirates are in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection measures.

Both dhows and whalers are being used as motherships. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred. Details of all alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx

Somali pirates operating in this area are looking to pirate merchant ships, yet past activity has shown that pirates will attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Larger yachts with more people onboard or a group of yachts could be seen as a valuable and easy target for the pirates. For more information, please read the Let your Yacht take the ferry document located in the “New on the Web Page” section on the NSC website main page.

Early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended, as per Section 5 of BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. NSC would like to remind masters that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the High Risk Area (HRA) to prevent pirate boardings.

Masters are reminded of the need for continued adherence to Best Management Practices 4 (BMP4) when navigating throughout the entire region of the HRA. Masters are advised that the threat of piracy against merchant shipping is always present throughout the entire HRA, and are advised to ensure all necessary Self Protection Measures are implemented as recommended in BMP4. Prudent and timely application of BMP4 can make the difference between being approached, attacked or pirated. Please be reminded that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the HRA to prevent being pirated.

It has been observed recently that some Masters are choosing to phone their Company Security Officer (CSO) first in the event of a piracy incident. One of the fundamental requirements of BMP4 states that UKMTO is the primary point of contact for merchant vessels during piracy incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA) which should avoid unnecessary delay and possible inaccurate or incomplete information reaching military commanders. CSOs should ensure their ships’ security plan reinforces the BMP4 recommendation that UKMTO should be telephoned on +971 50 55 23215 in the event of any piracy activity. UKMTO will then make every effort to contact the CSO as a matter of priority with any information received, whilst ensuring the relevant information reaches the military commanders with the minimum of delay.

Masters are also reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea , Bab al-Mandeb and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out by mechanized or single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew using long lines. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.

As noted above, if an incident occurs, Masters are to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone and provide as much information as possible and as accurate regarding the incident. This will ensure the information is quickly provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance. If Masters are safely able to take pictures and/or video of the suspicious activity, please provide these via email to UKMTO at ukmto@eim.ae, NSC (NATO Shipping Centre) at info@shipping.nato.int and Maritime Security Centre Horn of Africa (MSCHOA) at postmaster@mschoa.org. This information will be used by Counter Piracy forces to combat piracy activity.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 24 May to 30 May 2012 the number of piracy incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA) has remained low, with only one pirate approach reported.

Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx

Due to the arrival of the South-West monsoon between May and September, sea conditions in the High Risk Area are expected to become generally unfavourable for small boats.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

There have been no significant changes over the past week. Masters are advised that fishing activity is expected to continue and likely increase in this area over the next few months.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

On 23 May (reported in the Daily Update 24 May 2012) a merchant vessel was approached (NSC 021/12) by 3 skiffs in the Bab-Al-Mandeb at position 12 48N 043 11E. Six to eight people were seen on board each skiff and weapons were sighted. The skiffs were last seen heading towards Yemeni waters.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness. Somali pirates are in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection measures.

Both dhows and whalers are being used as motherships. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred. Details of all alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx

Somali pirates operating in this area are looking to pirate merchant ships, yet past activity has shown that pirates will attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Larger yachts with more people onboard or a group of yachts could be seen as a valuable and easy target for the pirates. For more information, please read the Let your Yacht take the ferry document located in the “New on the Web Page” section on the NSC website main page.

Early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended, as per Section 5 of BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. NSC would like to remind masters that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the High Risk Area (HRA) to prevent pirate boardings.

Masters are reminded of the need for continued adherence to Best Management Practices 4 (BMP4) when navigating throughout the entire region of the HRA. Masters are advised that the threat of piracy against merchant shipping is always present throughout the entire HRA, and are advised to ensure all necessary Self Protection Measures are implemented as recommended in BMP4.Prudent and timely application of BMP4 can make the difference between being approached, attacked or pirated. Please be reminded that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the HRA to prevent being pirated.

It has been observed recently that some Masters are choosing to phone their Company Security Officer (CSO) first in the event of a piracy incident. One of the fundamental requirements of BMP4 states that UKMTO is the primary point of contact for merchant vessels during piracy incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA) which should avoid unnecessary delay and possible inaccurate or incomplete information reaching military commanders. CSOs should ensure their ships’ security plan reinforces the BMP4 recommendation that UKMTO should be telephoned on +971 50 55 23215 in the event of any piracy activity. UKMTO will then make every effort to contact the CSO as a matter of priority with any information received, whilst ensuring the relevant information reaches the military commanders with the minimum of delay.

Masters are also reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea , Bab al-Mandeb and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out by mechanized or single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew using long lines. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.

As noted above, if an incident occurs, Masters are to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone and provide as much information as possible and as accurate regarding the incident. This will ensure the information is quickly provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance. If Masters are safely able to take pictures and/or video of the suspicious activity, please provide these via email to UKMTO at ukmto@eim.ae, NSC (NATO Shipping Centre) at info@shipping.nato.int and Maritime Security Centre Horn of Africa (MSCHOA) at postmaster@mschoa.org. This information will be used by Counter Piracy forces to combat piracy activity.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 17 May to 23 May 2012 there has been a decrease in pirate attacks in the High Risk Area (HRA) with only one suspicious activity reported. For the coming week, weather conditions are expected to be suitable for small boat operations, thus Pirate Attack Group (PAG) activity is expected to continue. Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map:

http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx

When contacting UKMTO and the NSC to provide information on suspicious activity, please provide as much detail as possible, including photos if available. Also, please provide the most accurate report of the incident as possible in order to assist military assets to respond most effectively.

It has been observed recently that some Masters are choosing to phone their CSO first in the event of a piracy incident.

One of the fundamental requirements of BMP4 states that UKMTO is the primary point of contact for merchant vessels during piracy incidents in the High Risk Area which should avoid unnecessary delay and possible inaccurate or incomplete information reaching military commanders.

CSOs should ensure their ships’ security plan reinforces the BMP4 recommendation that UKMTO should be telephoned on +971 50 55 23215 in the event of any piracy activity. UKMTO will then make every effort to contact the CSO as a matter of priority with any information received, whilst ensuring the relevant information reaches the military commanders with the minimum of delay.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

There have been no significant changes over the past week. Masters are advised that fishing activity is expected to continue and likely to increase in this area over the next few months.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

On 19 May a suspected Mothership was reported (NSC 020/12) approx 150 Nm South East of Masirah Island, in position 19 47N 060 49E. The dhow has 3 large ladders as well as a skiff on deck. The dhow is dark in colour with a white superstructure and a green/white line along the hull.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness. Somali pirates in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection measures. Both dhows and whalers are being used as motherships, in the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred.

Details of all alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx

Early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended, as per Section 5 of BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. NSC would like to remind masters that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the High Risk Area (HRA) to prevent pirate boardings.

Somali pirates operating in this area are looking to pirate merchant ships, yet past activity has shown that pirates will attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Larger yachts with more people onboard or a group of yachts could be seen as a valuable and easy target for the pirates. For more information, please read the Let your Yacht take the ferry document located in the “New on the Web Page” section on the NSC website main page.

Masters are reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea (SRS), Bab al-Mandeb (BAM) and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out by mechanized boats and single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew using long lines. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates when able; fishermen may carry small arms.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 10 May to 16 May 2012 there has been an increase in pirate attacks in the High Risk Area (HRA) with two vessels attacked, one vessel pirated and three disruptions. Pirate Attack Group (PAG) activity is still expected to continue. Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx
When contacting UKMTO and the NSC to provide information on suspicious activity, please provide as much detail as possible, including photos if available. Also, please provide the most accurate report of the incident as possible in order to assist military assets to respond most effectively.
It has been observed recently that some Masters are choosing to phone their CSO first in the event of a piracy incident.
One of the fundamental requirements of BMP4 states that UKMTO is the primary point of contact for merchant vessels during piracy incidents in the High Risk Area which should avoid unnecessary delay and possible inaccurate or incomplete information reaching military commanders.
CSOs should ensure their ships’ security plan reinforces the BMP4 recommendation that UKMTO should be telephoned on +971 50 55 23215 in the event of any piracy activity. UKMTO will then make every effort to contact the CSO as a matter of priority with any information received, whilst ensuring the relevant information reaches the military commanders with the minimum of delay.
Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)There have been no significant changes over the past week. Masters are advised that fishing activity is expected to continue and likely to increase in this area over the next few months.Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

On 12 May 2012 naval forces from European Union (EU) in the Somali Basin conducted a successful disruption on a land based pirate camp.
On 11 May 2012, NATO and Counter Piracy forces from EU successfully disrupted 2 PAGs. The first, in the Northern SB was made up of a single dhow towing 2 Skiffs. The second in the Southern AS was made up of a single dhow.
On 10 May 2012, a merchant vessel was pirated (Alert 040/12) by two skiffs in position 15 58N 06103E in the South AS. The ship is now under pirate control and is anchored off the Somali coast. Also a merchant vessel was attacked (Alert 041/12) by a skiff in position 14 18N 058 27E approximately 150nm South West from the pirated vessel on the same day.On 09 May 2012, a merchant vessel was attacked (Alert 039/12) by 2 white skiffs in position 10 40N 060 04E approximately 360nm South East of Socotra Island. A mothership and a total of 8 skiffs were reported at the same location.
Counter Piracy Guidance Update
Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness. Somali pirates in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection measures. Both dhows and whalers are being used as motherships, in the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred.
Details of all alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx
Early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended, as per Section 5 of BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. We would like to remind masters that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the High Risk Area (HRA) to prevent pirate boarding’s.
Somali pirates operating in this area are looking to pirate merchant ships, yet past activity has shown that pirates will attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Larger yachts with more people onboard or a group of yachts could be seen as a valuable and easy target for the pirates.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 3 May to 9 May 2012 there was one suspicious approach in the High Risk Area (HRA). In the past two weeks there has been a decrease in the number of incidents in the HRA. Pirate Attack Group (PAG) activity is still expected to continue. Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx

When contacting UKMTO and the NSC to provide information on suspicious activity, please provide as much detail as possible, including photos if available. Also, please provide the most accurate report of the incident as possible in order to assist military assets to respond most effectively.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

There have been no significant changes over the past week. Masters are advised that fishing activity is expected to continue and likely to increase in this area over the next few months.
Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/ Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

On 07 May 2012, a merchant vessel was approached by 3 skiffs approximately 260nm south east of Socotra at position 08 08N 056 18E (Alert 038/12).

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness. Somali pirates in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection measures. Both dhows and whalers are being used as motherships, in the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred.

Details of all alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx

Early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended, as per Section 5 of BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. NSC would like to remind masters that BMP4 highly recommends maintaining maximum vessel speed when transiting the High Risk Area (HRA) to prevent pirate boardings.

Somali pirates operating in this area are looking to pirate merchant ships, yet past activity has shown that pirates will attack both large and small yachts passing their way. Larger yachts with more people onboard or a group of yachts could be seen as a valuable and easy target for the pirates. For more information, please read the Let your Yacht take the ferry document located in the “New on the Web Page” section on the NSC website main page.

Masters are reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea (SRS), Bab al-Mandeb (BAM) and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out by mechanized boats and single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew using long lines. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates when able; fishermen may carry small arms.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 26 April to 2 May 2012 there was one suspicious approach in the High Risk Area (HRA). This reporting period has seen a decrease in the number of incidents in the HRA. Pirate Attack Group (PAG) activity is still expected to continue. Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

On 29 April 2012, a merchant vessel reported a suspicious approach (NSC 019/12) by four grey skiffs in vicinity of South Red Sea (SRS) in position 1326N 04239E. The majority of the people on board two of the four skiffs were carrying weapons.
Masters are advised that fishing activity is expected to continue and likely to increase in this area over the next months.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/ Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

There have been no significant changes over the past week for this area.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia and in darkness. Somali pirates in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection measures. Both dhows and whalers are being used as motherships, in the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred.

Details of all alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx

Early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended, as per Section 5 of BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated.

Masters are reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea (SRS), Bab al-Mandeb (BAM) and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out by mechanized boats and single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew using long lines. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates when able; fishermen may carry small arms.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 19 to 25 April 12 there was one pirated dhow, one released vessel and one suspicious activity in the High Risk Area (HRA). This reporting period has seen a decrease in the number of incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA). Pirate Attack Group (PAG) activity is still expected to continue. Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map here: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

On 21 Apr 12, a fishing vessel and two associated skiffs were pirated approximately 17nm South of Ras Fartak, 15 20N 05 212E (Alert 035/12). The fishing vessel is described as having a brown hull with a dark blue stripe just beneath a white guard rail and a light brown upper structure. The fishing vessel is approximately 20m in length and is towing at least one skiff.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/ Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

On 24 April 12, a merchant vessel reported 4 suspicious skiffs (Alert 036/12) approaching her position in the Central Somali Basin at position 04 49 N 054 47 E. The suspected PAG surrounded the vessel.
On 23 April 12, after negotiation with pirates, MV ENRICO IEVOLI was released and is now back under the owner’s control. All crew and the vessel are now safe. Vessel is en route to a safe port. MV ENRICO IEVOLI was pirated on the 27 December 2011 in the Arabian Sea.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. As demonstrated with Alert 036/12 on 24 Apr 12, Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia. NSC 035/12, from 21 April 12, also illustrates that Somali pirates are positioning themselves close to the traffic lanes in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection measures; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8-metre whalers are preferred as motherships.

Early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended, as per Section 5 of BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated.

Masters are reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea (SRS), Bab al-Mandeb (BAM) and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out by mechanized boats and single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew using long lines. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates when able; fishermen may carry small arms.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 12 to 18 April 12 there was one disruption, one attack, one approach and two reports of suspicious activity in the High Risk Area (HRA).

As it is now the monsoon transition period and the sea states continue to be favourable for small boats, it is expected that Pirate Attack Group (PAG) activity will continue to increase.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

On 14 April 12 there was a report of two skiffs believed to be dark grey and dark blue in colour acting suspiciously in the eastern GOA (NSC 017/12). These two skiffs may have been working with a 30m vessel of unknown description in the area.

Masters are advised that, due to the favourable conditions for small boats, fishing activity is likely to increase. When contacting UKMTO and the NSC to provide information on suspicious activity, please provide as much detail as possible. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates when able as fishermen may carry small arms.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/ Gulf of Oman (GOO)/Mozambique Channel (MC)

On 16 April 12, Naval Counter-Piracy forces have disrupted a dhow based PAG in the northern Arabian Sea.

On 16 April 12, there was a report of suspicious activity involving one dhow and one skiff approximately 60nm off the coast of Tanzania, in vicinity of 09 48 54 S 040 31 24 E (Alert 034/12).

On 14 April a merchant vessel was approached by one skiff in the northern Arabian Sea, in position 16 54N 065 59E (NSC 018/12). This is the same situation that was reported in NAVWARN 036/12 and Alert 033/12, which can be found at www.mschoa.org.

On 13 April 12 a merchant vessel was attacked approximately 50nm off the coast of Mozambique, in position 11 18 S, 041 00 E (Alert 032/12)

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, in conjunction with masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. As demonstrated with Alert 030/12 on 06 Apr 12, Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia, even out into the GOO. NSC 016/12, from 09 April 12, also illustrates that Somali pirates are positioning themselves close to the traffic lanes in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection measures; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8 metre whalers are preferred as motherships.

Early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended, as per Section 5 of BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated.

Masters are reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea (SRS), Bab al-Mandeb (BAM) and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off the coast of India is generally carried out by mechanized or single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew and using long lines.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 05 to 11 April 12 there was one hijacking (which was subsequently freed), one attack and one suspicious approach in the high risk area (HRA).

As it is now the monsoon transition period and the sea states continue to be favourable for small boats, it is expected that (PAG) activity will continue to increase.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

There have been no incidents in these areas over the past week.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)/ Gulf of Oman (GOO)

The evening of 04 April 12, one merchant vessel was attacked approximately 60nm off the coast of Oman in position 21 38N 059 59E (Alert 029/12). The MV was attacked by one skiff with 4 to 6 persons on board (POB). Weapons were discharged against the merchant vessel, and through the use of BMP4 recommended Ship Protection Measures, the vessel defended itself and the pirates ceased their attack.

On 06 April 12, one merchant vessel was hijacked in the GOO, approximately 15nm off the coast of Iran in position 25 28 N 057 32 E (Alert 030/12). This MV was later freed from pirate control and is now safe.

On 09 April 12, one merchant vessel was approached by one skiff approximately 400nm east of Socotra Island, in position 12 14N 061 45E (NSC 016/12). The skiff is believed to be white in colour, with approximately 5 POB and may be working with another small craft of unknown description. The PAG that conducted this approach is still believed to be in the area. This is the same situation that was reported in NAVWARN 034/12 and Alert 031/12 which can be found at www.mschoa.org.

There are still suspected Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) off the coasts of Oman, Yemen, and Somalia.

Specific areas of suspected and known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map here: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx

Details of all alerts can be found webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, complemented by masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. As demonstrated with Alert 030/12, Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia, even out into the GOO. NSC 016/12 also illustrates that Somali pirates are positioning themselves close to the traffic lanes in search of vessels of opportunity, such as those who are not readily employing BMP4 recommended Ship Protection measures; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8 metre whalers are preferred as motherships.

Early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended, as per Section 5 of BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated.

Masters are reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea (SRS), Bab al-Mandeb (BAM) and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out by mechanized boats and single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew using long lines. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 29 March to 04 April 12 the vessel that was hijacked on 26 March (MV EGLANTINE, Alert 027/12) was freed from pirate control and is no longer a threat to merchant shipping.

As it is now the monsoon transition period and the sea states continue to be favourable for small boats, it is expected that (PAG) activity will continue to increase.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

There have been no incidents in these areas over the past week.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)

Although piracy related activity has decreased over the past week, there are still known Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) off the coasts of Oman, Yemen, and Somalia.

Specific areas of known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map here: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx

Details of all alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

As demonstrated with Alert 027/12, Somali pirates have shown the ability to act far off the coast of Somalia, as far east as position 07 00 N 069 49 E. Early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended, as per Section 5 of BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated.

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, complemented by masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. However, pirates continue their attempts to hijack any vessel of opportunity; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8 metre whalers are preferred as motherships.

Masters are reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea (SRS), Bab al-Mandeb (BAM) and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out by mechanized boats and single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew using long lines. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 22-28 March 12 there was one merchant vessel (MV), and one dhow hijacked (Alert 027/12, NSC 014/12), and three attacks against MVs (Alerts 024/12, 025/12, 026/12), as well as two areas of suspicious activity reported in the HRA (NSC 013/12, NSC 014/12).

As it is now the monsoon transition period and the sea states become more favourable for small boats, it is expected that (PAG) activity will continue to increase.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

A dhow was hijacked on 26 Mar 12 approximately 10NM northeast of Raas Caseyr light, Somalia, in vicinity of position 12 00N 051 22E. It is believed to be white in colour, and its current location remains unknown. We remind all owners to inform UKMTO, MSCHOA, and/or NATO Shipping Centre as soon as possible of any potential incident of concern. Timely information and reporting will assist in timely responses and action.

Although this area has seen a lower level of activity compared to the past two weeks, Masters are still advised that piracy can occur at any time and that merchant vessels transiting this area maintain vigilance through the GOA and SRS areas.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)

There has been an increase of piracy related activity in the AS, as the weather has been favourable for small boats.

On 24 March 12, a merchant vessel was attacked by one skiff approximately 300nm southeast of the Omani coast, in position 16 58N 064 48E (Alert 024/12).

On 25 March 12, a merchant vessel was attacked by two skiffs approximately 140nm northeast of Socotra Island (Alert 025/12).

On 26 March 12, a merchant vessel was attacked by one skiff as a part of a whaler PAG approximately 300nm west of the north Seychelles, in position 05 21S 049 18E (Alert 026/12).

On 27 March 12, a merchant vessel was hijacked 200nm west of the northern Maldives in position 07 00N 069 49E (Alert 027/12).

On 28 March 12, a PAG has been confirmed active approximately 160nm off the coast of central Somalia, in vicinity of position 08 30 N 053 00 N (Alert 028/12). The PAG is reported as a suspicious blue coloured skiff with 7 persons on board and a hooked ladder.

Masters are advised to proceed through these areas with extreme caution, and be aware that the PAGs responsible for the recent attacks in the north Arabian Sea are still believed to be near the areas of the attacks.

Specific areas of known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map here: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx

Details of all alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Pirates have extended their furthest range out to 069E, as the hijacking of a merchant vessel on 27 Mar 12 demonstrates. Early registration with MSCHOA before entering the HRA and regular reporting to UKMTO are highly recommended, as per Section 5 of BMP4. Prudent and timely implementation of all recommended actions and ship hardening measures in BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated.

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, complemented by masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. However, pirates continue their attempts to hijack any vessel of opportunity; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8 metre whalers are preferred as motherships.

Masters are reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea (SRS), Bab al-Mandeb (BAM) and up to 50 nm off the west coast of India. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to safeguard fishing nets. Fishing off India is generally carried out by mechanized boats and single hull boats with outboard motor carrying 4-5 crew using long lines. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.

If any incident occurs, Masters are requested to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone and provide the details of the incident. This will ensure the information is provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance. If Masters are safely able to take pictures and/or video of the suspicious activity, please provide these via email to UKMTO (ukmto@eim.ae), the NATO Shipping Centre (info@shipping.nato.int) and MSCHOA (postmaster@mschoa.org).

News

NATO Allies agreed on 19 March to extend the Alliance’s counter piracy naval operation Ocean Shield, which operates off the Horn of Africa to protect merchant traffic from pirate attacks, for a further two years until the end of 2014.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 15-21 March 12 there have been four piracy related incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA): three merchant vessels was attacked ( 021/12, 022/12, 023/12) and a Pirate Attack Group (PAG) was disrupted.

As the monsoon period is over and the sea state becomes more favourable for small boats, it is expected that (PAG) activity will increase in the weather transition period.

NATO Allies agreed on 19 March to extend the Alliance’s counter piracy naval operation Ocean Shield, which operates off the Horn of Africa to protect merchant traffic from pirate attacks, for a further two years until the end of 2014.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

A PAG was active in the central GOA consisting of at least two skiffs. These skiffs are believed to be involved in the attack against a merchant vessel on 17 March 12, in position 13 09N 048 45E (Alert 021/12). PAGs operating to the East of Socotra and off the coast of Somalia may be using dhows and whalers as motherships.

On 17 March 12, in the Gulf of Aden, the Turkish Navy Ship (TCG) Giresun, acting as part of NATO’s counter-piracy (Operation OCEAN SHIELD), successfully disrupted a group of pirates suspected of having been involved in the attack of a merchant vessel in the GOA area. For more information, please visit the Allied maritime Command HQ Northwood website: http://www.manw.nato.int

Masters are advised to transit this area with extreme caution but are also reminded that the BAM and Southern Red Sea (SRS) are areas of high fishing activity. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or warn ships from getting too close to their fishing nets. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)

On 19 March 12, a merchant vessel was attacked by one skiff approximately 240nm off the coast of central Somalia, in position 05 39N 053 20E (Alert 023/12). This is approximately 30nm south of the alert in position 05 47N 053 50E (Alert 022/12) dated 17 March 12. These attacks highlight an increase in piracy activity over the past few days, especially off the coast of central Somalia.

Masters are advised to proceed through these areas with extreme caution, and be aware that the PAGs responsible for the recent approaches in the north Arabian Sea are still believed to be in the area.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, complemented by masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. However, pirates continue their attempts to hijack any vessel of opportunity; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8 metre whalers are preferred as motherships.

Prudent and timely application of BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 08-14 March 12 there have been two piracy related incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA): one vessel was approached by suspected pirates (NSC 012/12) and one merchant vessel was attacked (Alert 020/12). As the monsoon period is over and the sea state becomes more favourable for small boats, it is expected that Pirate Attack Group (PAG) activity will increase.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

On 09 March a merchant vessel witnessed a dhow towing three skiffs acting suspiciously (NSC 012/12) approximately 150NM North West of Socotra in vicinity of 1420N 05239E. Masters are advised to transit this area with extreme caution but are also reminded that the BAM and Southern Red Sea (SRS) are areas of high fishing activity. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or to warn ships from getting too close to their fishing nets. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)

PAGs are active in the North Arabian Sea and there continues to be suspicious pirate related activity off the Omani Coast, although the only attack during the reporting period occurred in a different location. On 11 March a vessel was attacked 210NM East of Socotra in position 1313N 05750E (Alert 020/12). The vessel escaped through successful use of Best Management Practices (BMP4) procedures. Masters are advised to proceed through these areas with extreme caution, and be advised that the PAGs responsible for the recent approaches in the north Arabian Sea are still believed to be in the area. Specific areas of known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map here:

http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx

Details of all alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, complemented by masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. However, pirates continue their attempts to hijack any vessels of opportunity; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the AS and the northern SB the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8 metre whalers are preferred as motherships.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 01-07 March 12 there have been four piracy related incidents in the High Risk Area (HRA): a Pirate Attack Group (PAG) was disrupted (017/12), a merchant vessel was hijacked (Alert 018/12), one merchant vessel was approached by suspected pirates (NSC 010/12) and one merchant vessel was attacked ( 019/12).

As the monsoon period is over and the sea state becomes more favourable for small boats, it is expected that Pirate Attack Group (PAG) activity will increase in the weather transition period.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

At 0519Z on 06 March 2012 a merchant vessel was attacked by 1 skiff approximately 200NM Southwest of Salalah (Oman) in position 14 20 N 052 45E. Skiff is described as wooden and dark in colour. (Alert 019/12) Masters are advised to transit this area with extreme caution but are also reminded that the BAM and Southern Red Sea (SRS) are areas of high fishing activity. Fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities or warn ships from getting too close to their fishing nets. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)

PAGs are active in the North Arabian Sea, off the coast of Oman. 02 March 12, a merchant vessel was pirated approximately 150NM NE of Masirah (Oman) coast at position 1634N 05948E. (Alert 018/12) On 03 March 12, a merchant vessel sighted a suspicious group of skiffs in the vicinity of 2127N 06237E. One of the skiffs followed the merchant vessel for approximately 2 hours despite the merchant vessel taking evasive action. (NSC Alert 010/12) On 01 March 12, a merchant vessel reported 2 boats and 3 skiffs acting suspiciously in vicinity of 17 05N 058 08E (Alert 017/12).

Masters are advised to proceed through these areas with extreme caution, and be advised that the PAGs responsible for the recent approaches in the north Arabian Sea are still believed to be in the area. Specific areas of known PAG locations can be found on our PAG map here: http://www.shipping.nato.int/operations/OS/Pages/PAGmap.aspx
Details of all alerts can be found on NSC Alert details webpage: http://www.shipping.nato.int/Pages/AllAlerts.aspx

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, complemented by masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. However, pirates continue their attempts to hijack any vessels of opportunity; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS the preferred motherships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8 metre whalers are preferred as motherships.

Prudent and timely application of BMP4 can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or pirated. If any incident occurs, Masters are requested to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone and provide the details of the incident. This will ensure the information is provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 23-29 February 12 there have been three piracy related incidents: a dhow was hijacked (Alert 016/12), one merchant vessel was attacked (NSC 09/12), and one merchant vessel was approached by suspected pirates (NSC 08/12).
As the monsoon period comes to an end and the sea state becomes more favourable for small boats, it is expected that Pirate Attack Group (PAG) activity will increase in the weather transition period.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

On 28 February 12, a merchant vessel was attacked by two white skiffs that came within 1nm and fired at the merchant vessel. Masters are advised to transit this area with extreme caution but are also reminded that the BAM and Southern Red Sea (SRS) are areas of high fishing activity. The fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities and to warn ships from getting too close to their fishing nets. Masters are requested to ensure they distinguish between fishing vessels and potential pirates; fishermen may carry small arms.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)

PAGs are active in the North Arabian Sea, off the coast of Oman. On 28 February 12, a dhow was hijacked approximately 150nm north of Socotra Island, in vicinity of 15 01N 054 56E, and may be used as a mothership (Alert 016/12). Masters are advised that the hijacking of the MV LEILA was initiated by pirates claiming mechanical problems and seeking assistance.

Also on 28 February 12, a merchant vessel was approached by one skiff approximately 120nm south of the coast of Oman, in vicinity of 16 03N 058 58E (NSC 08/12). The skiff closed to approximately two cables distance from the vessel before aborting its approach.
Masters are advised to proceed through these areas with extreme caution, and be advised that the PAGs responsible for the recent approaches in the north Arabian Sea are still believed to be in the area.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by naval forces over the past few months, complemented by masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP4, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. However, pirates continue their attempts to hijack any vessels of opportunity; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS the preferred mother ships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB, 8 metre whalers are preferred as mother ships.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 16 – 22 February 2012 one merchant ship was pirated, one attacked and one approach occurred. Masters are advised that a recent hijacking was initiated by pirates claiming mechanical problems and seeking assistance. As the monsoon period comes to an end and the sea state becomes more favourable for small boats, it is expected that Pirate Attack Group (PAG) activity will increase in the weather transition period.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

On 22 February an oil tanker has been attacked in the GOA at position 1331N 05022E. Suspicious activity reported in the BAM has been assessed to be fishing activity. Masters are reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea (SRS). The fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities and to warn ships from getting too close to their fishing nets.
Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)
PAGs are active in the North Arabian Sea, off the coast of Oman. There may be PAGs within a 100nm radius of approximately 16 00N 061 30E. MV LEILA was hijacked off the coast of Oman in position 1810N 05721E (Alert 013/12) on 15 February 2012.
PAGs have been operating in vicinity of position 0500S 06500E located east of the Seychelles. A merchant vessel was approached 500nm east of the Seychelles in position 0529S 05959E (Alert 014/12) on 18 February 2012. These incidents highlight the need for continued adherence of BMP when navigating through any region of the High Risk Area (HRC).

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by counter piracy forces over the past few months, complemented by masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. However, pirates continue their attempts to hijack any vessels of opportunity; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS it has been noticed that the preferred mother ships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB the preference is to use 8 metre whalers as mother ships.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 09 – 15 February 2012 there has been a high volume of pirate related activities compared to the previous week. One merchant ship was pirated and one approach occurred over the reporting period.
According to an article published in Somalia Report (US-registered Somali news website) the pirate operations will begin for some pirates on 20th February. The article stated that the pirate groups are divided in two; the one who operates throughout the Wajiilo (monsoon) season and the one who prefers to wait for better weather. As the monsoon period comes to an end and the sea state becomes more favourable for small boats, it is expected that Pirate Attack Group (PAG) activity will increase in the short term.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

The level of piracy activity was increased in this region during this reporting period. A lot of suspicious activity was reported in the BAM but it was not specific enough to issue an alert. Masters are reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea (SRS). The fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities and to warn ships from getting too close to their fishing nets. PAGs are also becoming more active against Dhows. One dhow was robbed in vicinity of Salalah (Oman) on 14th February around 1600Z. A dhow was reported hijacked on 12th February following departure from Bosasso en route to Berbera (Somaliland). A photo of this dhow is provided and masters are cautioned that it could be used as mothership for pirates.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)

The MV Free Goddess was hijacked in the Arabian Sea at position 1605N 06226E (Alert 012/12). One merchant ship reported suspicious activity (NSC 07/12) approximately 120nm east of the coast of Oman (2001N 06039E). Masters are advised to proceed through these areas with extreme caution, and be advised that the PAG responsible for the recent approaches in the Greater Somali Basin is still believed to be in the area.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by counter piracy forces over the past few months, complemented by masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. However, pirates continue their attempts to hijack any vessels of opportunity; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS it has been noticed that the preferred mother ships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB the preference is to use 8 metre whalers as mother ships.
Prudent and timely application of BMP can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or being pirated. Masters are encouraged to get as much detail as possible including photographs or video of any vessel acting in a suspicious manner.

Old Report

The reporting period of 2-8 February 2012

GHANA: Offshore tug boarded by four robbers on 9 February while berthed at position 04:53 N – 001:45 W, Takoradi Port. The robbers, armed with long knives, threatened duty watchman and stole ship’s stores, and escaped in a waiting canoe. No crew injuries and incident reported to port authorities. (IMB).

THE CONGO: Container ship boarded on 4 February by an unknown number of robbers while anchored at position 04:46 S – 011:47 E, Point Noire Anchorage. Duty watchman found wet footprints on deck and padlock to bow thruster room broken. Crewman informed duty officer, who then noticed a small boat alongside the vessel. Duty officer raised alarm and mustered the crew. Upon further inspection, a number of storage lockers were broken into and ship’s stores and spare parts noted stolen. Small boat escaped. Ship’s master attempted to report the incident to port authorities, but received no response. (IMB)

ARABIAN SEA: Bulk carrier hijacked on 7 February while underway near position 16:03N – 062:26 E, approximately 520nm NE of Socotra Island, Yemen. UKMTO was first notified about the potential hijacking when the vessel owner informed them that he could not contact the vessel. The Free Goddess was en route from Adabiya, Egypt to Singapore, carrying 19,475 metric tons of steel cable with a crew of 21 on board. (Press)

INDONESIA: Tanker boarded on 7 February while anchored at 01:06 N – 103:28 E, Karimun STS anchorage. Duty crewman on rounds sighted three robbers, armed with steel rods, on the aft deck area and immediately raised the alarm. The robbers escaped without taking anything. Incident reported to port authorities. (IMB)

Old Report

The reporting period of 26 January to 01 February 2012 has been very quiet. There was one approach in the Arabian Sea (NSC 4/12) and there are indications of possible pirate activity as illustrated in two areas of concern on the Pirate Attack Group (PAG) map.

Masters are advised to be vigilant as PAGs are active and waiting for the opportunity to attack merchant ships. Masters are asked to report any suspicious activity to UKMTO and NSC.
Masters are reminded that the threat of piracy is always present in the High Risk Area (HRA) and are advised to completely implement self-protection measures as recommended in Best Management Practices (BMP4). Prudent and timely application of BMP can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or being pirated.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

The level of piracy activity was low during this reporting period. Masters are reminded that a large number of fishing vessels operate in the Southern Red Sea (SRS). The fishing vessels may approach a merchant ship in order to maximise fishing opportunities and to warn vessels from getting too close to their fishing nets.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)

There has been one suspicious approach, and two areas of suspicious activity noted in the Arabian Sea.

On 28 January there was a merchant vessel approached by one orange coloured dhow to a range of 450 metres in position 0455N 05814E. One of the areas of suspicious activity is in vicinity of 0053N 06017E, approximately 420nm NE of the Seychelles and 240nm SE of the approach detailed in NSC 4/12.

The other area of suspicious activity is located off the coast of central Somalia due to indications that pirates are preparing to head out to sea.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by counter piracy forces, complemented by masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Pirates continue their attempts to hijack any vessels of opportunity; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS it has been noticed that the preferred mother ships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB the preference is to use 8 metre whalers as mother ships.

Extra vigilance, strict implementation of and adherence to all applicable BMP and Self-Protection Measures remain essential for all areas. Masters are encouraged to get as much detail as possible including photographs or video of any vessel acting in a suspicious manner.

If any incident occurs, Masters are requested to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone and provide the details of the incident. This will ensure the information is provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance.

Old Report

The reporting period of 19 to 25 January 2012, has been very quiet. There was one disruption, two approaches, and two reports of suspicious activity.

Two individuals kidnapped by Somali pirates on 25 October 2011 were rescued on 25 January 2012.

Masters are advised to be vigilant as PAGs are active and waiting for the opportunity to attack merchant ships. Masters are asked to report any suspicious activity to UKMTO and NSC.

Masters are reminded that the threat of piracy is always present in the High Risk Area (HRA) and are advised to completely implement self-protection measures as recommended in Best Management Practices (BMP4). Prudent and timely application of BMP can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or being pirated.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

The level of piracy activity was low during this reporting period, however; on the 19th of January a merchant ship reported being approached by two skiffs in the SRS in the vicinity of 1535N 04138E. On the 24th of January a merchant ship reported two suspicious skiffs in the SRS in the vicinity of 1322N 04247E.
Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)

The Pirate Attack Group (PAG) responsible for the approach on a merchant ship south east of Oman (Alert 008) was disrupted within 24 hours of the incident.
On 21st January a merchant ship reported being approached by a grey skiff in the Gulf of Oman (Alert 010) in the vicinity of 2451N 05728E. On the 24th of January a merchant ship reported a suspicious vessel in the Strait of Hormuz in the vicinity of 2538N 05701E.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by counter piracy forces, complemented by masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Pirates continue their attempts to hijack any vessels of opportunity; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS it has been noticed that the preferred mother ships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB the preference is to use 8 metre whalers as mother ships.

Extra vigilance, strict implementation of and adherence to all applicable BMP and Self-Protection Measures remain essential for all areas. Masters are encouraged to get as much detail as possible including photographs or video of any vessel acting in a suspicious manner.

If any incident occurs, Masters are requested to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone and provide the details of the incident. This will ensure the information is provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 12 to 18 January 2012, there have been three Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) disrupted, two attacks on merchant vessels, four incidents of suspicious activity, one suspicious approach, and one previously pirated vessel released from captivity.

The number of disruptions conducted by naval Counter-Piracy (CP) forces this week has significantly reduced the pirates’ capability to engage in piracy during this reporting period. Since the beginning of January 2012, approximately 70 suspected pirates have been detained by CP forces.

Masters are advised to be vigilant as PAGs are active and waiting for the opportunity to attack merchant ships. Masters are asked to report any suspicious activity to UKMTO and NSC.

Masters are reminded that the threat of piracy is always present in the High Risk Area (HRA) and are advised to completely implement self-protection measures as recommended in Best Management Practices (BMP4). Prudent and timely application of BMP can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or being pirated.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

The level of piracy activity was lower during this reporting period due to disruptions conducted by naval CP forces. However; on the 17th of January there were three reports of suspicious skiff activity in the western region of the IRTC.
Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)

There were two attacks (Alerts 006 and 007), three disruptions, one incident of suspicious activity (Alert 005) and one approach (Alert 008) in this region over this reporting period. The PAGs involved in the attacks on the 12th and 16th (Alerts 006 and 007) of January were both disrupted within 24 hours. On Tuesday 17th of January, a vessel was approached by one skiff off the coast of Oman (Alert 008). The skiff detailed in Alert 005 was disrupted approximately 50nm off the coast of Mogadishu on the 12th of January.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by counter piracy forces, complemented by masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Pirates continue their attempts to hijack any vessels of opportunity; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS it has been noticed that the preferred mother ships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB the preference is to use 8 metre whalers as mother ships.

Extra vigilance, strict implementation of and adherence to all applicable BMP and Self-Protection Measures remain essential for all areas. Masters are encouraged to get as much detail as possible including photographs or video of any vessel acting in a suspicious manner.

If any incident occurs, Masters are requested to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone and provide the details of the incident. This will ensure the information is provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance.

Old Report 05 to 11 January 2012

During the reporting period of 05 to 11 January 2012, there have been two incidents of suspicious activity, four Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) disrupted, and one previously pirated vessel released from captivity. The number of disruptions conducted by naval Counter-Piracy (CP) forces this week has significantly reduced the pirates’ capability to engage in piracy during this reporting period.

Masters are reminded that the threat of piracy is always present in the High Risk Area (HRA) and are advised to implement self-protection measures as recommended in Best Management Practices (BMP4). Prudent and timely application of BMP can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or being pirated.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

In the previous reporting period, there were multiple PAGs and piracy incidents in this region. The level of piracy activity was lower during this reporting period due to disruptions conducted by naval CP forces. However, the disruption of the dhow AL-QASHMI in the IRTC by naval CP forces on Friday 06 January indicates that pirates are intent on this region.
Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)

There were three disruptions, one approach and one mother ship located in this region over this reporting period. On Thursday 05 January, a vessel was approached by one skiff off the coast of Oman (Alert 003). This skiff was interrupted by a naval CP helicopter, and skiffs mother ship dhow was disrupted later in the evening.

A Jelbut style dhow was disrupted off the coast of central Somalia by naval CP forces on Sunday 08 January.

On 10 January, the previously pirated vessel M/V LIQUID VELVET (Alert 004) was used by pirates as a mother ship and was interrupted from piracy activity by naval CP forces later on the same day, but is still in the hands of the pirates.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by counter piracy forces, complemented by masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Pirates continue their attempts to hijack any vessels of opportunity; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS it has been noticed that the preferred mother ships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB the preference is to use 8 metre whalers as mother ships.

Extra vigilance, strict implementation of and adherence to all applicable BMP and Self-Protection Measures remain essential for all areas. Masters are encouraged to get as much detail as possible including photographs or video of any vessel acting in a suspicious manner.

If any incident occurs, Masters are requested to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone and provide the details of the incident. This will ensure the information is provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance.

Old Report 29th December 2011 to 4th January

During the reporting period of 29th December 2011 to 4th January 2012 pirate activity against vessels has increased, but is still less than the same time last year. Two vessels were attacked and 3 vessels were approached in the Gulf of Aden (GOA). As well, areas of suspicious activity are noted in the IRTC, and in the north Arabian Sea. Masters are advised to be vigilant as Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) are active and waiting for the opportunity to attack merchant ships.

Masters are reminded that the threat of piracy is always present in the High Risk Area (HRA) and are advised to implement self-protection measures as recommended in Best Management Practices (BMP4). Prudent and timely application of BMP can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or being pirated.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

The wave height in the GOA and BAM has decreased, contributing to these areas having an increase in piracy activity and consequently a higher threat to merchant shipping. PAGs are known to be in these areas, including the PAGs involved in the recent attacks and approaches.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)

With the increasing NE monsoon, piracy activity in the Arabian Sea is expected to decline, although better weather closer to the coast may tempt some pirates to head out and attack vessels of opportunity. There have been reports of some suspicious vessels 180nm off the coast of Oman, in vicinity of 1630N 05930E. Masters are advised to be vigilant when transiting this area and contact UKMTO if they see any suspicious activity in this region.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by counter piracy forces, complemented by masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Pirates continue their attempts to hijack any vessels of opportunity; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS it has been noticed that the preferred mother ships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB the preference is to use 8 metre whalers as mother ships.

Extra vigilance, strict implementation of and adherence to BMP and Self-Protection Measures remain essential for all areas. Masters are encouraged to get as much detail as possible including photographs of any vessel acting in a suspicious manner.

If any incident occurs, Masters are requested to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone and provide the details of the incident. This will ensure the information is provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance.

Old Report

During the reporting period of 22-28 December 2011 pirate activity against vessels was low. One vessel was hijacked on 27 December approximately 50NM off the coast of Oman in the vicinity of 1818N 05736E. Details can be found in Alert 250. Masters are reminded that the threat of piracy is always present in the High Risk Area (HRA) and are advised to implement self-protection measures as recommended in Best Management Practices (BMP4). Prudent and timely application of BMP can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or being pirated.
On 22 December a suspicious approach by two skiffs was reported in the Central Arabian Sea in the vicinity of 1122N 06333E. On 26 December, three skiffs were reported behaving in a suspicious manner in the Gulf of Oman approximately 30NM from the coast of Iran in the vicinity of 2458N 06020E.
One hijacked vessel was released and is currently underway to a safe port.
Masters are advised to be vigilant as Pirate Attack Groups (PAGs) are active and waiting for the opportunity to attack merchant ships. Specific areas of concern are indicated on the PAG Map.

Southern Red Sea (SRS)/Bab Al Mandeb (BAM) / Gulf of Aden (GOA)/Internationally Recommended Transit Corridor (IRTC)

The NE monsoon has increased wave height in the SRS, BAM, GOA, and IRTC areas, which has reduced piracy activity. These areas are still of concern as PAGs are known to be in these areas, and are likely to take advantage of short term favourable weather conditions to attack vessels of opportunity. Prudent and timely application of BMP can make the important difference of being approached, attacked, or being pirated. Pirate skiffs will continue to blend into local fishing traffic; thus this area remains a high threat region.

Arabian Sea (AS)/Greater Somali Basin (SB)

With the increasing NE monsoon, piracy activity in the Arabian Sea is expected to decline, although some regions of better weather closer to the coast may tempt some pirates to head out and attack vessels of opportunity.

Counter Piracy Guidance Update

Successful disruptions by counter piracy forces, complemented by masters’ adherence and implementation of BMP, have significantly reduced the pirates’ ability to capture vessels. Pirates continue their attempts to hijack any vessels of opportunity; a reminder that piracy can occur at any time. In the northern SB and AS it has been noticed that the preferred mother ships are local dhows, whereas in the southern SB the preference is to use 8 metre whalers as mother ships.
Extra vigilance, implementation and adherence to BMP and Self-Protection Measures remain essential for all areas. Masters are encouraged to get as much detail as possible including photographs of any vessel acting in a suspicious manner.
If any incident occurs Masters are requested to report immediately to UKMTO via telephone and provide the details of the incident. This will ensure the information is provided to other ships in the area for their awareness and vigilance.